7 Months and Why I Stopped Breastfeeding.

The last few weeks I feel like this little girl has exploded with personality.  She has really waken up.  We are all learning more and more about her strong opinions on different matters like the car wash.  She does NOT like the car wash but she sure does love being held/loved on/next to us as much as possible.

*Skye has REALLY found that voice of hers and she is all about squeaking, grunting, yelling, singing, babbling as much as possible.  She is currently saying Da-da on repeat which makes Andrew extremely happy (and it makes me continually whisper ma-ma into her ear whenever I am holding her;)

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*I’ve tried to master this yoga pose for years and Skye can do it after just 7 months of life.

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*She continues to hold a single tear under her eye after she is upset about something to remind us of what happened.  It’s a little dramatic.

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*Brooke and Knox are extra lovey with her now that she is more entertaining for them (they thought she was kind of boring when she slept 20 hours a day).  I heard Brooke talking to her the other night about the bunk beds they are going to have when she turns 3.  My sis and I had bunk beds so that warmed my heart.

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*Just living her glam life.

Let’s chat about sleep.  She has been sleeping through the night pretty regularly now!  Her morning nap is usually from about 9:30-12:00.  She then takes an afternoon nap whenever we can fit one in (usually in the car since we are doing stuff for B & K at that point in the day) and then if we aren’t out at night, we put her down at about 7.   At around 10-10:30 we wake her up for a bottle and then she’ll sleep until about 5 a.m.  I feed her, go run and then and she goes back down until about 7:30.   When we put her down later at night (ie 9-10) she wakes up during the night which is so strange to me.  Before bed I give her a warm bath some of the nights and a little baby massage with lotion.  I feed her a big bottle and give her a paci and blanket and boom–>  we lucked out with how she is doing.

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*My hair has started to grow back.  Please expect many hair horn post-run pictures due to the new hair coming back over the next few months.  Seriously, it was so crazy how much hair I was losing!

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*She wears a bib when she eats in the high chair but that does not protect her from the fact she manages to get food EVERYWHERE when she eats.  I don’t even understand how she does it so she eats naked with just her diaper and a bib on for most meals right now.  I can’t handle anymore laundry.

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*Her movement has exploded and we love it.  When she is sitting on our laps her arms are flapping around, her head turning side to side searching for Brooke and Knox and her legs kick continuously.

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*Like I said at the beginning, Skye is a huge fan of attention and love.  She takes it all in and we love giving it to her.

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*We practice tummy time daily and every now and then she will roll but we do not see her crawling or attempting to crawl anytime soon.

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*I think she experiences major FOMO if she is missing out on us doing something all together without her and she wants to join asap (aka she wakes up from her nap as soon as she can sense us doing something fun).

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*This girl is grabbing at everything these days.  If it is in arm’s reach (well, actually if it is within her sight;)… Skye is reaching for it.

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*She is officially a waver.  Not sure if this is a normal baby thing but she loves to wave at us!

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*The Fresh Food feeder might be her favorite thing on the planet.  This girl LOVES chomping on fruit and veggies with this thing.

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*We had an appointment with the pediatrician this week and she is growing like a champ.

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*Gone are the days I can let her sit on my lap while I work.  Last time I tried that my keyboard ended up on the ground with pieces flying everywhere.  She is still doing well studying with Andrew though.

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*I am SO afraid of accidentally pinching her when I am putting her in the carseat with the snap.  Random but it just freaks me out.

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Let’s talk about breastfeeding for a second (or probably a while because I’m pretty long winded on subjects like this).

I am no longer breastfeeding and while I know it isn’t my fault, I still feel like it somehow is because as Andrew says, I tend to blame myself for a lot of stuff ha.

I just took out the majority of this post… I don’t think I explained things very well and I really hope I didn’t give out misinformation about breastfeeding.  Long story short, Skye refused eating from me and continued to do so for a few weeks.  I’m not sure why this happened and I still feel so awful about it and I’m crying as I type this.  I knew it was the right decision for both me and Skye but it is still so hard.  I’m sorry if I said the wrong things.

I guess part of me still feels bad about it for a few reasons.  I’m an emotional person.  Always have been, always will be.  I made a goal to feed her for a year and I didn’t reach my goal.  Mom guilt is real and I felt like I had figured out breastfeeding really well and it was like the one area in my life where I was rocking one of my goals and now I’m like… I’M NOT HITTING ANY OF MY GOALS (I’m dramatic, yep).  I learned with Brooke that it truly doesn’t matter… our relationship is solid and she is as healthy as can be but I just miss the closeness and feeling like I was the only one that can feed Skye thing.  It’s silly.  I know and definitely not a problem in the grand scheme of things but I just really wanted to continue doing it.  In a few months I’ll look back and wonder why I felt bad about it all…  It’s kind of that problem with social media too, I see SO many women breastfeeding until their little ones are well over one year old and I think—>  What the heck is wrong with my body?!  Did I give up too quickly?  Did I not try hard enough.  I don’t know.

So while I usually tell you about problems I have been through in the past and the solutions that I have figured out to help me get through the problem… this time I’m kind of in the middle of it.

But as far as good news—>   We can afford formula (which was a huge stress with Brooke so I feel very lucky this time) and Skye is very healthy and happy.   Physically I feel more like myself again.  I haven’t felt that way in 1.5 years so that is kind of nice.  My anxiety has started to fade back to my normal levels too.  Skye is actually forming more and more rolls on her cute little legs between her drinking from the bottle (my freezer milk/formula) and solids so that is the cutest thing.  It’s one of those topics that if a friend/reader/human was telling me they were experiencing this, I would tell them, ALL THAT MATTERS is that you love that little one.  As long as they are fed, you are doing amazing.  Being a mama is tough and you just have to do the best thing for your baby and YOU.  You are ENOUGH.  More than enough.  I know from experience (Brooke) that babies turn out perfect via formula.  Love fiercely and let the things that you cannot control go.

A post that I wrote during pregnancy actually really helped me to feel better:

Brooke and Knox are sure loving being part of the feeding process now and Knox loves to rub her little arm or head when he feeds her.

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When did your kids start crawling?  Walking?

Learned any important parenting lessons lately share them with me!

Mom’s reading—>  What is your breastfeeding story?  

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90 comments

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Yes yes yes – your perspective is spot on janae!! You love your sweet baby and you’re caring for her and nourishing her. She’ll never know or care that you didn’t breastfeed her til she turned 1 – she just knows mommy loves her and always, always takes care of her.
Thanks for your open and honest post! Can’t believe how quickly skyes first year is flying by!

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Oh thank you so much Laura!!! I hope you are having the most beautiful day. I know right, she is going to be 1 before we know it ahhh!

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7 months of breastfeeding is so much and you did so much good for Skye in that time. Having a mom who is happy and not stressed out is the most important thing for her so you made the right choice to stop when it wasn’t physically working anymore.

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Thank you Victoria and that is totally the thing now… the stress/anxiety/obsession is gone and I feel like I am better able to focus on her now compared to those last few weeks of breastfeeding/pumping for me. Gotta be thankful for those months that worked well! I hope you have a wonderful day and thank you so much for taking the time to write to me!

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Oh Janae! Breastfeeding is SOOO hard! You are awesome for making it to 7 months! I have six kids and I only managed to nurse 3 of them to a year, and it was seriously such a fight (there were times when I was pumping and syringing milk down their throats with a medicine dropper). My first stopped nursing at 4 months and then when babies 5 & 6 wanted to stop early I was finally wise enough to realize that it wasn’t worth the huge drain on my emotions to continue trying to fight them into nursing just so I could make it to my self-imposed goal of a year. It was such a relief for me to stop that battle and just enjoy my sweet babies!

I didn’t notice a huge difference in my milk production with running, but I did notice that when I was taking progesterone-only birth control I really struggled with milk production. Maybe that’s just me, but something to think about for future babies!

And one final thought–I breastfed two babies through marathon training cycles and man oh man it was such a pain to go run for 16 miles, come home, nurse, and then go back out for the last 4 miles when I was cold and cramped up! (plus that poor baby having to nurse when I was so sweaty…). I put off weaning one baby until a week before the race (because I knew he was my last baby) and that was not such a good idea–yikes!

Anyway, super long comment, but just to say there are so many good things about formula, and I’m glad that now you can relax, enjoy sharing feeding times with Andrew and the kids, and revel in long runs without worrying about a hungry baby at home. ;-)

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Rachael, THANK YOU for taking the time and writing a comment for me… I LOVE long comments. Six kiddos–> You are incredible. It is so interesting to me how it can be so different with each of your kids too! “Wasn’t worth the huge drain on my emotions to continue trying to fight them into nursing just so I could make it to my self-imposed goal of a year.” <--- YES x a million and just what I needed to read. Thank you SO much. And bf while marathon training, amazing. Thank you and enjoy the rest of your day!

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My little guy is 5.5 months. It has been fun to follow along with these updates! Breastfeeding was so hard for me in the beginning and I still have to supplement with formula Almost daily. I was so hard on myself in the beginning for not being able to make enough milk for him. But as time has gone on I know I am doing my best and he is loved, happy, and healthy. That I cannot feel bad or complain about! As for crawling, he is just scooting along on his face 😂! We’ll get there!

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AHHH our babies are so close in age. I wish we could do playdates together! Isn’t it crazy how I look at your situation and think you are a total rockstar and rocking it when you were feeling hard on yourself in the beginning? Working on that compassion for myself! You are doing amazing and the ‘scooting along on his face’ made me laugh haha! Have a wonderful day and I hope you are sleeping!

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My son turned 7 months old on June 26th, and the EXACT same thing happened to my milk!! I work full time so I thought his nursing strike was just a bottle preference, but as we started to give him more bottles and I started to pump more my milk was thin and watery and oddly had a green tint to it?! So we stopped breastfeeding too. I also wanted to make it to a year, but I’m just trying to focus on the positives. Like fitting back into my shirts that were too small in the chest two weeks ago!

It’s so nice to hear someone go through the same things. <3

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COREE—> Our kiddos are so close in age! I love it. WOW, this is so interesting that we really experienced pretty much the same thing. Let’s just keep on focusing on the positives–> Yep, wearing one sports bra for my runs now sure feels nice ha. Have a beautiful day and keep me updated on everything!

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Hey, I lasted a whole 6.5weeks. I had ‘Diet Coke Boob’. All the taste, none of the calories. 😜
I totally understand how you feel. My friends and I have a mantra “Whatever it takes”. Whilst we all live by it as parents (and don’t judge others), I still feel like I failed at times. Be kind to yourself.

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Diet Coke Boob! Hahahaha, I love it!

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Janae, you are a great mom! Keep on being your awesome self! I appreciate your honesty about how hard it can be to be a mom, because of outside pressures, but how in spite of those challenges, it is so clear how much you love your kids.

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Don’t feel bad at all for not nursing! 6 months is an awesome amount of time for that. With my second I stopped at 6 months because it was causing so many random problems. I got down to 87 pounds!! It was a little scary. Plus I just hated sitting there and nursing because I felt like o was doing it all the time. I didn’t feel like it was bonding. It was time. Then with my son I stopped at 4 months because I hit 100 lbs and didn’t want to get too low. I also just wanted to feel like myself again. Skye is getting all she needs and now that she’s eating more real food she won’t want milk as often anyway. You did the right thing!

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I had every intention on breastfeeding my kids. With my first I had a horrible labor/delivery and was told that was the cause of my milk never coming in. I tried EVERYTHING for 6 weeks before acknowledging that it wasn’t going to happen. For my second, I tried for 2 weeks. My kids are only 14 months apart so I didn’t have the time to invest like I did before and once again, no milk. I was devastated. I still have times where I blame myself and try to figure out where I went wrong. My son is at the top of the growth charts and is a happy toddler, and that’s all that matters. My daughter is struggling with dairy allergies and so the very specialized formula is what she needs and is finally starting to gain weight (she’s 3 months old). I still feel like a failure at times though.

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That’s so interesting. Mine are 15 months apart and I had a very similar experience. There is no time to sit around when you have a 14 or 15 month old too!

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With my daughter I tried for 5 months and it was a struggle the entire time – I had to supplement with formula. I felt horrible and like a total failure and I would OBSESS over ways to increase supply. Everything I ate, drank, and did revolved around increasing my supply. Eventually I knew I couldn’t live like that so I switched to formula and felt immense mom guilt after that.

Then I had my son. And I nursed him for 18 months. It wasn’t “easy” at first but I think I was just much more relaxed about things and just more experienced from the beginning so by the time he was 2 months old nursing was a breeze.

But guess what? My daughter is one of the smartest in her class, is a talented dancer, and all-around amazing kid so 🖕🏻 to any articles that make you feel like formula will make your kid less smart/talented/whatever than a kid that was nursed!

You are doing a fantastic job as a mom and stepmom and as a fellow mom/stepmom/way-slower runner I’ve loved following along with your through the years! Xoxo

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Hi Janae! Just commenting to say that you’re a great mom! You recognized an issue with your milk, addressed it immediately, and made the best decision for your child so she can continue to grow and thrive. I hope you can look at it that way instead of feeling guilty! (Mom of 2; made it 5 months with baby 1, and 6 weeks with baby 2 because he had severe food allergies and I could literally only eat unseasoned meat and steamed vegetables which was NOT something I could maintain).

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Sending hugs! I had to stop nursing at 6 months because of my daughter’s allergies- I cut out dairy, egg, and gluten and she was still getting sick. It was so hard and I cried a bunch because I had such a good supply and I loved our bonding time. But, I pumped for a while and donated over 1000 ounces to an adopted baby which was amazing.

My daughter crawled at 6.5 months and walked at 9.5 months- SO early! It made me grateful she was my first. At 18 months old she runs and climbs on everything!

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Wow to the donated milk!! That’s incredible!!!

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Aww thanks! I was so blessed with a great supply. My sister is adopted so being able to give to an adopted baby was so special. It made not being able to keep nursing a little better.

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We made it 10 months, then my guy decided he was way too old for breastfeeding. I was sooo upset, but in truth my body was relieved. Just like you the quality of my supply had changed and he just wasn’t into it. 3 years later, everyone is awesome and it didn’t make a difference. You are amazing

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Seven months of breastfeeding is amazing! Well done, Mama! As long as Skye is happy and healthy and you are happy and healthy, there’s nothing else that matters! As mothers, we put so much stress on ourselves to live up to certain expectations and I don’t know why we do it.

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The same thing happened with my milk when my son was four months old. He stopped sleeping through the night and was really fussy- turns out he was starving. He actually dropped off his growth line on the growth chart… I felt awful but I had no idea/ I was pumping more than enough ounces to feed him there just wasn’t any nutrition in it. He’s three and a half now and is as big as my almost 7 year old daughter.

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I breastfed my girl for nine months. Honestly, I planned on six but when I got there, I decided to go for a year. Of course, good intentions aside, I had a three week long trial and was unable to pump during the trial. Result- the same situation you had. After my milk supply dropped, we finished up the freezer stash and went to formula.

I remember deciding that one night would be the last night breast feed– I thought it would be this sacred moment. I was anticipating having her big eyes stare up at me with love. Reality- she was not enjoying the feeding, she started screaming, then I got her a bottle and she went to sleep. Oy. Parenting.

Good on you giving it a go after what a tough experience you had last time. And doing it with two other kiddos that needed your help. You’re awesome.

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Sending you a HUGE hug, Janae!! You are so right, all that matters is that sweet baby girl is being fed and loved!! I struggled so badly with breast feeding my daughter and the anxiety and guilt surrounding it was horrible. I quit after a bad case of mastitis and felt so much better when I was done (only made it about 10 weeks but something is better than nothing, right?). You just do what is right for you and your baby <3

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I nursed my oldest, Mason, until about 6 weeks opd. I got Mastitis so bad and couldn’t push through. I nursed my second, Taylor, until she was a year with no issues. My youngest, Peyton, was able to nurse until she was 3 months. She got RSV and weened herself and I was devastated!!!! I never got to enjoy the last nursing experience and knew we wouldn’t have any more kids. All three were different nursing experiences and challenging in their own way. Like you said, the important thing is they are happy and getting the nutrients they need. I understand the mom guilt but remember…God chose you to be Skye’s mom! She is precious and wonderfully made!

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My daughter is almost exactly skyes age and she has been formula fed since she was about a month old- formula has been amazing for our family!! My daughter never latched and I never produced. When I tried pumping it was the same thing as you- thin watery milk! I would feed it to my daughter and she was starving two seconds later. Nothing is worse than a hungry baby. I am extremely passionate about breastfeeding NOT being right for everyone. If it works and you want to do it, great. If not, that’s great too! When I was struggling all I wanted was for one person to tell me it was okay to stop breastfeeding- thank goodness for my mom and my OB who finally said stop!!

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Thank you for sharing your breastfeeding experience with us! It is so, so hard to let that expectation that you “should” be breastfeeding go, and be gentle and kind with yourself when breastfeeding isn’t the best option for WHATEVER reason (time, stress, milk production, pain, etc). You summed that up so perfectly and gracefully. There are so many other wonderful things mamas do that we can focus on rather than put our focus on breastfeeding – I firmly believe breast is not best; rather, FED and LOVED is best.

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Thank you for sharing your story. My oldest, now 5 1/2, I BF until she was 11 months old, and then just didn’t produce enough milk so she had one month of formula before she got regular milk. My youngest, who will be 8 months next week, is still going strong with BF. Getting her to take a bottle on the other hand…that’s a no go! I seriously try every single day and she just won’t! We have a similar sleep schedule at night over here. I say, just do what you are doing. As long as those cute rolls keep forming, and she is fed and loved, you are doing a great job!

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I’m 3 months into breastfeeding with my first and it’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done. I have an initial goal of 6 months but every day I tell myself I’ve already made it 3! Small goals. But honestly, 7 months is amazing! I know society makes us feel guilty for what we HAVENT done but be proud you made it to 7! Even one day is hard and I tell new moms that. Whatever you can do is amazing. Skye is a lucky girl :)

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I don’t remember when mine started crawling, but walking was shortly after she turned a year. Breastfeeding for me went very well. But right after her birth, I developed this bad itch and rash on my hands. It’s a form of dermatitis. But they said, people who don’t have it, birth can trigger it, and if you can it, a birth could clear it up. Anyway, my Dr told me to take Benedryl to help relieve the itch. I asked will it harm the baby, are you sure it’s ok for me to take…a ton of questions. Except, I did not ask anything directly about my breastfeeding, because I thought my question about “this going through to the baby” covered that. So over the next few weeks, my milk decreased rapidly. I called the Dr in tears, and the nurse said “oh well of course Benedryl will decrease your milk supply, usually stops it”. It had, and I was so unbelievably upset, I stopped the Benedryl but couldn’t get it back. So I only got 3-4 months in. I had a huge grudge and actually switched Dr’s I was so mad they acted like I should have known that. I have since had a few friends take Benedryl when they wanted to end breastfeeding. Because they didn’t want the pain of feeling gorged and drying up. Benedryl just slowly ends it. Mom guilt is a cruel thing and is very real.

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I did feed Hope for a year, and she did that baby strike thing at 10 months. For 24 hours I can remember being devastated. Stepping back from it now, years later, I realize the mess was not really about the breastfeeding, it was due to the reminder that even with all good intention, planning, effort, etc what we set out to do can still have a force beyond us that changes circumstances. The unknown, one of my bigger fears, and it was showing its head in my breastfeeding experience.

Hugs to you!
One day Skye will probably call you with Breast feeding emotions and you will empathize, relate, and be just who she needs you to be because of this.
xoxo

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Hey Janae! How brave you are for posting this! I feel like there is SO MUCH pressure to breastfeed for a long time when the most important thing is a healthy and happy momma and baby. I breastfed for a year but I put SO MUCH pressure on myself to do it that I was stressed all the time. I remember when I stopped I enjoyed my little one so much more and was much more relaxed. In retrospect I wish I would have stopped sooner and enjoyed my little one more! I think you are doing a GREAT job and Fed is always best!

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Oh girl, I feel your mastitis pain!! I’m so sorry that that happened to you.

With my first, she was tongue-tied and wouldn’t latch. On top of that, I had a very hard labor and delivery experience (48-hour induction), my daughter ended up in the NICU so I just chose to exclusively pump for 6-months. She always had formula at night because I like sleep…my husband works 24 hour shifts so I was in survival mode, haha.

With my second, completely opposite labor and delivery experience (for the better) and he latched like a champ. However, I wore a strapless bra at a wedding within the first month of his life and ended up with mastitis the next day (even though I was pumping religiously during the wedding every 2-hours). He hated my milk. Then, a few weeks later, when he was about 2-months old, he developed thrush. Cue lots of tears and another 6-month journey with just my pump. He also got formula at night because…sleep, haha.

I am proud of you for making it as long as you did with Skye! She is perfect!!

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Hi Janae! I don’t have kids, but I hate the pressure my friends put on themselves to breastfeed! You do YOU and listen to what Skye needs and you need and all will be fine:) She is one loved, cute baby!

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Oh gosh, do not beat yourself up over breastfeeding! First of all, you did an amazing job getting her to 6 months. AMAZING. That’s not easy! And, even if you had never breastfed a day, you are raising a healthy, strong girl there. My babies are 15, 13 and 9 and they all had varying amounts of breastmilk – 9 months, 3 months, 0 months. I promise you there is zero difference in our bond or their health/intellect. We do what we can. You have a beautiful, precious family…such a blessing.

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Good job for making it to 7 months! It is funny, the American academy of pediatrics actually recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of a baby’s life. 6 months! Why did we all of a sudden as a culture decide to be so pushy and declare ‘moms NEED to breastfeed for one year?’ At least thats the message I got when my son was born. I get it, I mean breastfeeding is free compared to formula. And some mothers enjoy that breastfeeding bond. But after 7 months my son weaned himself (he had 6 teeth by then) and I was fine with that. And it is amazing how much better I felt physically and mentally after stopping. I think as moms we need to be kinder with ourselves and eachother regarding breastfeeding. So don’t feel bad about stopping breastfeeding, you made it past the AAP recommended length of time 😊

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Loved this post! I stopped breast feeding after 3 months due to low supply. The first two weeks of my daughter’s life we were at the doctor every other day for weight checks and jaundice tests as I didn’t realize she wasn’t getting much from me. I would pump for about 3 hours a day and end up with maybe 8 ounces and had to supplement with formula. I finally decided the stress that I was putting on myself wasn’t worth it. The mom guilt is real though. I am not an emotional person, but many tears were shed at the thought of going to formula although I look back and it’s such a minute detail! It got better though when she was still growing and a happy, healthy baby!

My little girl did not crawl until almost 10 months, then started walking at 12. I have to say I did not mind the fact that she wasn’t crawling! We have a dog that sheds and I’m sure tracks things in, so I did not mind at all that she stayed put for so long!

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OMgsh i could have wrote this post!!!

1. My 14 month old only eats in those plastic bibs and a diaper. I got the Tommy Tippee (sp?) ones that you just wash like a dish because the cloth bibs were not holding up. He is SO messy!!! And I even try to help him keep food on his “plate”.

2. Breastfeeding. MAN. I stopped at one month with my 14 month old but TO. THIS. DAY. I still have guilt that I did not try hard enough. I am due to #2 in October and now that I know what to expect, I really want to give this a good run. Don’t beat yourself up about making it one year. The fact you made it this far is amazing. It truly is. My first goal is to just make it to 6 weeks breast feeding, then 3 months, then 6… etc. It is overwhelming to think about going an entire year… especially as a working mom. So seriously, a BIG congrats for making it this far!

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I LOVE your goals… I am worried about the second baby because of my first experience and things not working out. I work full time so I think 6 weeks sounds like a great idea and then to go from there!

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Thank you so much for sharing, Janae! You are amazing. You are a wonderful mom and that has nothing to do with how your kids get their nutrition. Skye looks so happy and healthy and that is because of you and your family. Breastfeeding can be such a struggle (and mastitis is AWFUL!! I also used to get plugged milk ducts regularly, which was so stressful to manage, knowing that it could lead to mastitis). I’ve always told other women that if breast feeding your baby is causing too much stress in your life, it’s just not worth it. The stress will affect your mood and then everyone else around you. Happy mama = happy family.
And you should be so proud of yourself for the months you did breastfeed Skye. I think it’s hard when we have a very concrete goal in our heads and if we don’t meet it perfectly, it automatically means failure. I’ve been more recently taking advice of some articles I read about racing goals: have an A goal for if everything goes perfectly, but have a B and a C that are goals as well, adjusted for things like race conditions, injuries, or just a bad day. You still got out there and tried your best, so it shouldn’t be a total failure if you don’t meet the A goal.
So we should all try to have flexible goals for our lives as well because, well, life gets in the way sometimes!
Anyway, sorry this is long, but PLEASE don’t beat yourself up. You are amazing and you seem to have a wonderful family!

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So I am NOT a mom :) But I read a story several years ago (which was news to me but I guess if you’re a mom you think that breast feeding is the best) that showed babies who were breast fed were “smarter” (um from a study published by whom i have no idea : ) ) So I said to my mother “Wow, I must have been breast fed for a REALLY long time”. And she said “No, you were never breast fed.” Baaahaaa :) I consider myself somewhat intelligent and knock-o- wood I am healthy as a horse (at age 39 and 51 weeks). So you do YOU and know everything is great.

(the reason I wasn’t breast fed was b/c I was a c-section and back in the olden days I guess they pumped you with drugs after and it wasn’t safe to breast feed? who knows but that is my mother’s story and she’s sticking with it ;) )

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Oh my goodness!! I can totally relate to your breastfeeding experience. I had a lot of trouble and switched to formula early with my son and told
myself that I had learned a lot and was optimistic with my daughter BUT told myself that if it didn’t work out, I had living proof in my little guy that formula was just fine! But after a really tough birth, I couldn’t get my supply up enough and breastfeeding and supplementing was exhausting for me. Even though I had a healthy outlook while pregnant, I fell right back into the trap of reading from some breastfeeding moms on social media talking about how it is selfish to not keep trying. But when I finally got on the other side with a few weeks of just formula with my daughter, I appreciated how much healthier and happier I felt. I wasn’t stressed out. I was a better mom to both of my kids because I felt better mentally and emotionally. I think it would have been great to make it a year, but I completely agree that I am super thankful there is an alternative to give my girl what she needs and feel fortunate that we can afford it easily this time around.

My daughter has been an early mover compared to my son! She is 8 months and has been crawling since right before she was 6 (my son never did! He scooted eventually but never crawled). It’s crazy what a wide range of “normal” is!!! I was actually a little sad when she started crawling. We had a few months of Jake sitting by staying put which was nice for taking a shower haha! Samantha sat up and it felt like the next week she was across the room. Nothing like a moving baby to make you realize how much of a death trap your house is ;)

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You did exactly the right thing, Janae. I work with babies, and hear this same story all the time when babies are between six and 10 months…Skye is so loved and that is all that matters. I always say it is actually better to stop in the summer months, before cold and flu season, as sometimes babies get sick more easily when they first stop — you don’t need the guilt about that too! Skye is a very luck baby to have such great parents and family support.

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I agree with everyone else…Syke is happy, healthy and LOVED! She’s a lucky little girl to have so many people that love and adore her :)

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It is hard, really. But…my oldest went on strike and quit cold turkey at 6 months. My middle kid weaned to formula at 7 months because I couldn’t produce the 80oz a day that he needed to be happy. And my youngest went on strike and quit at 10 months. The two oldest are pushing 6’1″ and the youngest never stops moving…I think they turned out okay with the breastfeeding/formula mix. Give yourself a big hug for job well done these last 7 months and now enjoy, guilt-free, the benefits of not nursing.

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I’m so glad that you made a decision that was right for Skye and for you. Breastfeeding affects our emotions so strongly, not only because of the societal pressure but because of the hormones that it stimulates! For me, I was dealing with very serious ppd and ppa and I got so focused on breastfeeding that I delayed getting treatment for myself. Those hormones made me believe that my only worth was being able to feed my son. Looking back, I wish that I had gotten treatment sooner, even if it had meant having to stop BFing, because I missed so much while I was in that dark hole. I can’t get back that time I missed being fully present with my children and I truly regret that. Do not regret stopping BFing because it is the relationship that matters, not the food source. You are doing a great job and you can see the joy radiating from your children’s faces. They sure love their mama!

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Awe, I hope you are feeling better by now. All she really needs is love. I was so set on breast-feeding but my twins were preemies, super tiny, and could not latch on. I tried to pump but I wasn’t producing enough. We had to feed them more frequently since they were so tiny, held them up half an hour after they ate because of extreme reflux, and then I would try to pump after that. After awhile, I just didn’t have the strength to do it anymore. We could barely afford formula but my husband said it was for my own sanity and he’s right. Hmm, recently I learned as a parent that there are more important things than things parents normally think about, like academic and sports achievements. Especially since our son was in the PICU. After that, my husband and I just totally shifted our focus on what was really important. Family and health. We just lost our dog the other day, too, so life is so short. It’s nice to enjoy people and moments instead of milestones. Have a great day, Janae!

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Oh Janae my hear t hurts for you because we all go through that to some degree. Being a mom is tough and the guilt is REAL! I think you are amazing for lasting as long as you did! Anyone who can do it at all leaves me in absolute AWE! I had a terrible experience and didn’t produce ANYTHING, zero, zilch. I never felt it come in or milk dry up. I would nurse for hours and then pump for hours and cry all day everyday! After Kennedy was losing weight and the dr told me I needed to stop I felt like such a failure, like I had failed her and we would never bond… blah blah blah! I decided one day to be happy about it because I could either cry and miss my entire 12 weeks of maternity leave trying to make it work or I could accept it, give her a bottle and enjoy all the time I had with her, so I did just that. I loved with a bottle that she was looking at my face instead of being blocked my by big boobs, I feel like I could talk to her and sing to her because I wasn’t in pain and I was just enjoying the moment! We all do our best and feeding our babies is what’s best so kudos to you for making it as long as you did. Skye is clearly healthy, happy and loved! Isn’t it amazing that we have formula so we can still feed our kids in theses cases? That helped me also, thinking about how amazing it is that we are advanced enough that we can still give them the proper nutrition. I would recommend not reading articles about breastfeeding, that made my anxiety so much worse because people try to scare you and make you feel less because you know “breast is best”… I think that’s crap! I say fed is best, a sane mama is best and being able to leave your baby overnight and have them sleep longer (because formula takes longer for them to digest, thus leaving them full and happy to sleep) is the best!!!! Just enjoy it all, I think it’s so great for Brooke and Knox to be able to help feed her as well for what it’s worth! You are awesome :)

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What a sweet post, Janae. Skye is absolutely beautiful and so lucky to have you as her momma! Don’t you worry about breastfeeding.. Skye is well fed and happy and that is all that matters!! <3

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Oh Janae! It breaks my heart to think that you ever had any doubt about what a rock star mama you are. All your kiddos are beautiful, happy, loved, and provided for, and that is all that matters. It is such a gift that you were able to breastfeed Skye for as long as you did, but even if that hadn’t been the case you would have given her what she needed all the same. I am sure it is so hard emotionally but it’s clear you are thinking about it the right way. I get that way a lot, where it seems like my heart has to catch up with my head! But you have a family and a blog full of readers who will reassure you as many times as you need that you have nothing to feel bad about. :)
I’m due next month with my first baby and I won’t lie, I look to your blog a lot for inspiration both as a runner and as a mom-to-be! So thank you so much for sharing your experiences with your internet friends, your words always help me so much when I’m going through the difficult times myself. I’m going to do my best to breastfeed this little one too, but it’s so good to see reminders that doing whatever is best for your baby may not end up looking like you expected it to, and that’s perfectly okay.

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KELLY… congrats on your little one coming next month. I am so so so excited for you. You are going to do an amazing job and I’m always here if you need mama pep talks/chats! Thank you for your sweet comment, it means the world to me. Have a beautiful day and keep me updated on EVERYTHING!!

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Thanks so much for sharing your story! I really think women need to understand that breastfeeding is not as easy/natural as it seems it should be! My son was born tongue tied and I had flat/inverted nipples. He wouldn’t take a bottle and refused formula. The struggle was REAL in the beginning. Once we had his tongue clipped it was like night/day! I ended up nursing him until he was 26 months. It got easier physically but I never had a super supply so I worried I wouldn’t have enough ALL the time. I like to say I made just enough for him. I try to get the word out to get help early and often! Those of us that share our struggles can help other mamas! 6 months is nothing to be ashamed of!

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YES YES YES… this last month I have just been questioning myself so much of why it isn’t feeling natural or easy like I see SO many other women experience! It’s hard! So glad that you were able to get your son’s problem fixed and I’m sorry about the huge struggle you experienced along the way to get there. Thank you for sharing and thanks for taking the time to write to me! Have a wonderful day Bridgette!

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1. You’re doing the greatest thing-doing what your baby needs to be healthy and strong.
2. You’re doing a great thing-taking care of yourself in the process!

Quick story-my daughter was severely lactose-intolerant. The 3 months I was able to breastfeed were torture for both of us! She was constantly in pain and wasn’t keeping anything down. This was 1999, so there wasn’t much of an internet to check and the only formula option was soy. So that’s what she ate!
18.5 years later she is healthy, strong, and our relationship is amazing. :D
God bless you and your adorable family!!

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Girl you did great! I made it 7 weeks and had to stop breastfeeding. I had an oversupply and the second time I got mastitis and was almost hospitalized my husband and I decided it was time to stop. I had enough milk saved for several more weeks and then I did not have to worry about pumping when I went back to work 11 weeks postpartum. My daughter will be 9 months old tomorrow and has been exclusively on formula for a while (and now solid foods) and she is thriving! We have a great relationship and she’s incredibly healthy, developing on track, and in my mommy opinion very smart.

You did great and gave Skye a great start. No reason to feel mommy guilt (but we all do!) So keep your head up and be proud of what you gave her. It looks like she’s living a great life surrounded by love and that’s more important that what she eats!

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Almost hospitalized… Megan, I can’t even imagine. Thank you for sharing how your little girl is doing, you are an amazing mama. Thank you so much! I really appreciate that you took the time to share this with me. I hope your day is beautiful!

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I live in Bangladesh and work in development. In the development sector it is considered BLASPHEMY to consider have beneficiaries (poor women, refugees, etc.) use formula and it makes me RAGEY! So incredibly ragey! I really struggled to breastfeed and I don’t think I would exclusively breastfeed EVER again. And for some reason, the ENTIRE development world thinks that women in already very high stress situations should just have to figure it out and breastfeed. Yes, there are a ton of benefits, but please for the love of God, give women a break and let them choose what they want to do. So, anyway, this is just to say that I am glad you are doing what is working for you and (not to be preachy!) be thankful you are not one of the thousands of Rohingya women who were raped fleeing the violence in Myanmar and are now being forced to breastfeed their children after incredible trauma.

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Kate, your comment. Thank you. I cannot even begin to imagine what these women go through. I’m sick. Thank you for doing what you do. I am so incredibly lucky. Thank you for sharing and I really appreciate you taking the time to write to me. Have a wonderful day!

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You’ve already gotten SO many comments, but I wanted to add mine. My baby is 1 month old (on Thursday!) and this has been so hard for us. She was born big (over 9 lbs! my first baby!) and my milk didn’t come in for 5 days. So hard — I tried pumping and then we tried to go back to breast. I thought she was just fussy, but it turns out she wasn’t getting enough. My supply dropped because she wasn’t transferring milk. So I’m back to pumping and she’s so much happier. But she still wants more! She’s taking 4 oz every 2-2.5 hours! (This is a baby who’s not even a month old!) I am not making enough so I’m supplementing, but I am coming to terms with the fact that I may not be able to have that breastfeeding experience. It’s so hard and I cry often. I want it, but I also want sleep and my baby to be happy/fed. We try our best and that’s all we can do. Thank goodness for formula. It nourishes babies and it’s pretty perfect. Also, it’s great that your kids can get in on the action!! That bonding experience is great for dads, siblings, grandparents… :)

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I’m giving you a big virtual hug Kaley. I am SO sorry you are dealing with this right now. It is SO hard. Your little girl is so incredibly lucky to have such an amazing mama. Keep me updated with everything and congrats. Keep doing what is best for YOU and her. Seriously, thank goodness for formula! I totally agree, everyone else is loving the bonding of feeding Skye too.

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Your decision to stop breastfeeding was absolutely best for everyone around. Food is Food and when they are grown no one will ever know who was breastfeed for 2 weeks or 2 years.

With that said I in case any one read this was having similar issues. It actually is fairly normal for breastmilk to appear watery. Breastmilk changes as babies age, so when your baby breast feeds at 2 months old that breastmilk supports a 2 month old. It is far different at 7 months. Kellymom has some information on it and if anyone is struggling they can google watery breastmilk or why does my breastmilk look watery. Believe it or not but breastmilk can also have a blue or green tint. There is also some other reasons, you might not have been reaching the fore milk and a few other things going on. A lactation consultant is often good for those issues. I am not at all saying that someone should continue nursing if it isn’t working however I don’t want someone to think that just because their breastmilk looks watery that it isn’t meeting the needs of their child. That isn’t the case, if your child is breastfeeding and happy and gaining, continue on. If your baby is not having it then of course there is an issue. I was lucky to have an excellent breastfeeding group led by a lactation consultant and was treated to a well of knowledge. But I always felt like if this just didn’t feel right that I would stop, I more or less liked the fact that breastmilk was free and that was my driving force ( I never shared that with the support group though!!)

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I did not know this Carrie. That is very interesting. I’m going to refer down to your comment in this post now (I’ll edit it right now). Now I’m really questioning what was happening. I’m not sure why Skye wanted nothing to do with it? Anyways, thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me about this!

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From what I understand, breastmilk increases in its water content as needed based on the hydration needs of the baby. So if its hot outside or the baby is just getting older you will produce milk with a higher percentage of water included – that’s why babies don’t have to drink much water.
Also I just wanted to tell you that i don’t think you are “silly” for feeling disappointed- and I don’t mean that in a negative way. Its just that it seems when we get disappointed in something we try to put a positive spin on it, which is good but it can also sort of guilt trap us into feeling “fine” about something that we actually have every right to have our own set of feelings about. Does that make sense? Anyways don’t overthink too much of it. But talk to a lactation consultant and ask her about your experience I’m sure you could get some insight into it and that could help you for next time! Sending hugs your way!

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Oh my gosh, the hair horns! I had my second baby December 16th and my hair is a mess with postpartum hair growth. I cannot for the life of me figure out where to part it so that the whole part isn’t just inch-long hairs sticking straight up. It makes me want to chop it all super short!

As for the breastfeeding thing, I’m sending you huge hugs. I struggled a ton with my first and he was combination fed until 3 months, and then only got formula after that. I beat myself up so much about it, but once I finally accepted that breastfeeding/pumping just wasn’t working out I felt a lot better about life and was finally able to enjoy being a mom for the first time. My second was a preemie and low birth weight and spent 18 days in the NICU and I knew it would be a huge uphill battle, so I opted not to breastfeed or pump and I am SO GLAD. My husband was able to take the first shift every night so I could sleep uninterrupted for 5-6 hours, which was so much better for our relationship and my mental health than both of us being up for every feed during the night with our first so I could pump. Both kids are totally healthy, and my older son who was less than 5lbs. when he was born is now in the 80th percentile for weight and 76th for height. I know I made the right decision in both cases, and I give you huge props for doing what you need to do to build those adorable rolls :-).

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7 months of breastfeeding is great! For me we had to do pumping of all breastmilk for my first since the latch was really bad and we could not get it better with lactation consultants or anything. After 7 months of pumping all the time and still supplementing with formula I decided to give up the pumping and stop worrying about it so I could spend some time taking care of myself (exercise at work since I felt too guilty to do that in addition to all my pumping sessions). Getting up at 4 am just to get a really good amount of milk was just not working for me anymore. You did awesome for Skye and have the right attitude about this. Mom guilt sucks, but not being stressed is much more important and Skye looks so adorable in all the pictures.

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My little guy is 8 months old and has been sitting up like a champ for about a month, but is not quite crawling yet. He rolls and scoots a bunch, though. We are still breastfeeding, and I know that I am very lucky to be able to do it. At my job, I meet women all the time who, for whatever reason (physical/emotional), can’t breastfeed. And you’re right – love your baby, cuddle your baby, feed your baby, and that’s all that matters.
My baby still wakes every 3-4 hours overnight, but he’s a bit tiny, so he needs the extra calories. I don’t really mind at all because I love snuggling him :)

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… and forgive me for saying this but you may want to put a little disclaimer about the condition of your breastmilk and how you arrived at your decision in your post. Of concern in particular is the part, “He said that Skye is getting better nutrition from the freezer stash or formula than what I was producing so to keep giving her that.” Watery/green (or orange/red/creamy/thick/lumpy/etc) breastmilk can actually be 100% normal and not a sole reason for moms to stop breastfeeding (unless they want to). You were right to consult a doctor, and I am absolutely not saying this to make you feel bad. I would just hate for a reader to be alarmed if she, herself, has green/watery breastmilk and is choosing to continue to breast feed. Your experience is anecdotal, and readers who are concerned about their own milk should consult their medical providers before stopping breastfeeding.
Does that make sense? Like I said, I REALLY don’t want to make you feel bad at all. As a medical professional, I just want to make sure breastfeeding readers know that your experience is your own, and they should consult their own doctor.

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Oh goodness, I don’t mean to “reply” to myself so many times, but I just noticed your “Carrie” referral, and then her comment. So sorry to be redundant!

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I am going through this right now!!!! I am SO hard on myself and it took a lot for me to even supplement. My milk supply randomly decreased by a ton and my poor babe just wasn’t getting enough food and it was also watery. I’ve been doing every to increase it and it hasn’t worked at all and it has been stressing me out. I’m considering stopping, too, because there isn’t anything I can do but it makes me sad. Thank you for sharing this! You did an amazing job and I think us mama’s are super easy to be hard on ourselves. Skye is adorable <3

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Breastfeeding is just no joke. I’m on my fourth baby and I’m still floored by how much work it is. I eat constantly and have to really focus on quality foods vs eating all the sweets/nutritionally packing stuff that are convenient. You did great getting this far! Plus your training will probably take off as all those hormones are finally gone!!

A note on your weight – mine stayed almost the exact same from birth until about a month ago. It coincided exactly with the six-month milk change and Paul starting on solids. I lost a little bit of fat and now I won’t lose anything else until he’s fully weaned after a year. It’s crazy how our bodies will hang on to what it needs no matter what!

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I am impressed by the kind comments on this post!! I have seen so many opinionated/rude/judgmental things said to women on the topic of breastfeeding whether mom breast feeds, pumps, or formula feeds it always seems like someone has an opinion to share! While it’s great to have a conversation about breastfeeding, i think it’s sad that there are any stigmas associated with breast feeding or bottle feeding. It’s safe to say almost any mom loves her baby more than anything and wants the best for him in every way and no one should feel compelled to prove that to anyone (other than your babe!). Janae, you ROCKED breastfeeding!!! You forged through sleepless nights, feedings around the clock, and mastitis!! For 7 months – that is amazing! I know you’re goal oriented, but don’t forget to celebrate the triumph of making it 7 MONTHS!!

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THANK YOU for this!! I struggle with this Mom guilt so so badly. My last babe has Down syndrome and struggled with latching very badly. It was taking hits to feed and I have 3 older kids so it just wasn’t working. So I gave up even trying and exclusively pumped and bottle fed for 8 MONTHS!! I was still getting some milk so I feel super guilty stopping but it was seriously killing me physically and emotionally. It was so so much work that I just couldn’t/didn’t want to do it anymore. She’s almost 11 months now and I still feel guilty. I need to let it go! But man, it’s hard. Especially since she can only have a very specialized formula or she violently vomits. Ugh! So hard. But thank you for reminding me that it’s okay and she will be okay I know that.

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I nursed both of my babies for a long time BUT I’ve never run more than four miles in my life. I would trade places with you in a heartbeat! Baby is adorable, fed, growing and you manage to balance motherhood and personal goals (i.e. running). That is awesome

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Oh Janae! You’re such an amazing mother and breastfeeding for a week or a year or 3 years wouldn’t change that one bit. Thank you for always being so open. I think there is so much pressure on women to breastfeed and I certainly fell into it. I insisted to myself that I needed to breastfeed my second baby the full year. I did for my first so of course I had to do at least that or better for my second. I happen to work for a breast pump company so the pressure was for sure alive and strong. My little one had started to bite me around 7 or 8 months and I did all the tricks to stop him but nothing worked, and while he would take a bottle at daycare he wouldn’t at all at home. So I persisted and pushed myself to keep going. It was painful and I was miserable but they’re was no stopping me. It got to the point where it was so severe that I knew I had gotten mastitis but it was around the holidays and nearing the one year mark and I couldn’t bother myself to go to the dr so I thought I could solve it with all of the home remedies. Unfortunately I waited far too long to get checked and wound up with a severe abscess infected with MRSA (bad staph infection), which required surgery and a 2 week hospital stay quarantined unable to see either of my children and several more weeks of home nursecare. Thankfully im fully recovered now but wouldn’t wish that on anyone and at the end of it all had this huge relief for being done! SO, after this novel I just want to reassure you that ending breastfeeding before whatever goal you’ve set for yourself can be the best decision for everyone’s. ❤️❤️❤️

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Thank you so much for sharing your story. You are an amazing Mom and a beautiful person. Breastfeeding for 7 months is long and you have done well for your baby girl. I am currently breastfeeding and pumping. It is a lot of work. I breastfed my daughter until she was 15 1/2 months old. It was pretty easy. 11 years later, I have a baby boy, and it is harder this time around. I am hoping to make it to 12 months. He is almost 7 months. Do not feel guilty about what you are doing for your children. I think you doing your best and giving your babies lot of love.

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I am glad you made the decision that worked for you and your family but I am very concerned as to where you got your info on “watery milk”. I would hate for readers to get misleading advice. An IBCLC would have been very helpful for your situation if you had wanted to continue with breastfeeding. Breastfeeding is THE hardest thing I have ever done and there have been strikes, mastitis, tongue ties, being at work…it’s not easy but so worth it. Your breastmilk composition cannot be judged on appearance and it is intelligent and ever changing. I hope you see where I’m coming from, love to you 💕

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7 months is amazing – you should be proud of yourself for giving Skye such a great start! With my first I made the mistake of pumping and giving her a bottle around 6 weeks – after that she refused the breast so I exclusively pumped and bottle fed for 6 more weeks but just couldn’t take it after that . With my second I was determined to make it to a year and did pretty well despite some hurdles (she had hip dysplasia and was in a full body cast from 3-6 months which did NOT make nursing easy!), but we kept passing thrush back and forth and finally that, in combination with a bad case of mastitis, forced me to wean her at little over 7 months, too. My girls are now 12 and 14 and are as healthy as can be!

I had to laugh at the hair horns as I have them, too, at the moment. I was very anemic and didn’t realize it until my hair started falling out – now that my iron supplements have finally worked their magic, it’s all coming back and there isn’t a hair product in the world that can tame the madness right now 😊.

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I know i was one to comment about the watery breastmilk, my point in doing that was only that I did not want a Mom out there to be alarmed if she too had watery breast milk. That alone means nothing and is perfectly normal. You did your best and no shame at all in it. The average Mom I believe nurses for 6 weeks. I have a friend that actually was so passionate about nursing that her baby was not gaining. It turns out she had an oral motor issue and could not transfer enough milk. The baby looked frail and thin by the time she switched to formula. I just share because to me that is completely ridiculous, it should never have gotten to that point. In a way you put your baby’ s needs before you if that makes sense!

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TOTALLY and I completely agree with what you said. I just felt like I needed to take it out so that I didn’t give out the wrong information! So I thank you for helping me out with that because I would feel terrible if I was doing the opposite of helping other women out there! THANK YOU for sharing Carrie. I learn so much from you guys!

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Just wanted to let you know I am thinking about you and think you should be so proud that you went 7 months and didn’t give up without a fight. You are an amazing mama! 7 months! Give yourself a high five!

Today was my last day breastfeeding Bella. While I was very fortunate to never struggle with supply or latching issues (although my supply did go down after she turned a year), it was emotional in a different way. While I am glad to be done after 18 months and hopefully never have to touch a pump again, ha!, I’m also sad and emotional that this time is over and that we are already onto the next chapter. She has a dairy allergy so I secretly thought I might be able to go to 24 months but my body was done and we agreed it was time. Anyway, I am thinking about you as we all experience our different bf journeys and share deep gratitude for having healthy, happy babies. xoxo

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Don’t mind me. Just getting caught up on the blog and leaving stalker amounts of comments.

But seriously. I know the phrase ‘breast is best’ and I hate it. ‘Fed is best’. And that is also my mantra when it comes to feeding older kids. It doesn’t always have to be ‘complete’ or from scratch or any of those things. Are the fed and loved? yes? check. check.

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Kason had a tilted jaw when he was born and that made breastfeeding really painful. Since he’s my first, I had no idea what I was doing.I started exclusively pumping up until he was 6 months old. My supply decreased with each period I got (4 months PP) and wouldn’t come back. So I somehow made the decision to quit. It was the hardesr decision, but i felt that Kason needed a happy mom, not a stressed out mom. It was hard the first month after stopping, but I’m happy I’m free of the ball and chain (pump). I can love on him more and don’t have to stress anymore, or feel like I’m feeding him twice.

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Love this post! Thank you for being so raw. I had a similar experience with breastfeeding – we did it until a little over 6 months until my son just refused my breast anymore. I was sad at first, because I didn’t know why he didn’t want me anymore, but he was just more into drinking and holding his own bottle at that point..and eating solids. I did, however, maintain pumping up until almost 12 months as I had an oversupply, so I could easily pump more than enough each day up until he was 13 months actually (I LOATHE pumping though, but hey, I didn’t want to waste it if I was still producing and could avoid having to buy formula). We never had to use any formula, but we had one can just in case haha (ended up donating it to my church in the end).

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As moms we can be so hard on ourselves. I know I worried when I stopped breast feeding my children (at 3 months and 5 months).

You did a great job feeding her for 7 months and now you’re doing a great job feeding her with bottles!

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Good job on breastfeeding for 7 months. I notice women in The USA seem to have the most problems with breastfeeding.

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I am a little late to this post – but I had to comment. When I read your sentiments about stopping breastfeeding, it took me back a couple years to when I stopped with my son. He too was about 7 months old and between work/daycare, pumping frustrations, and my son’s reduced interest in nursing , it just wasn’t working anymore. I finally made the decision to stop and then cried HARD for like 3 days about it. I wanted to go at least a year and had to remind myself that 7 months is A LONG TIME! My point being – of course it’s an emotional transition, and I applaud you for being honest and sharing your feelings. It’s hard to breastfeed, and just as hard to stop, but it doesn’t make you any less amazing as a mama! On the bright side, how wonderful is it to feel like yourself again!? Once my tears dried, I remember feeling refreshed and focused without all the extra nursing worries :) Formula certainly has it benefits. Best of luck!

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Hi. That’s a great article. I am a new mom and still learning about feeding and all about how to be mom. your experienced would be very helpful. Now, i have a problem with breast milk pumping with a bit result. I’m finding a good Breast Pump here is my visit http://www.womensedge.org/best-breast-pumps/. Could you give me suggestion about how to choose the Pump? Thank you in advance for your suggestions.

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Hi, I am a new mom and still learning about feeding and all about how to be a mom. So, there is no doubt that I found this article helpful. You did a great job feeding her for seven months, and now you’re doing a great job feeding her with bottles! I have learned something from here about breastfeeding. And I will keep remembering in my mind. Thanks for the sharing your story.

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