How does altitude effect our running and 4 things from yesterday!

The elevation where I live and train is—>  4756 ft.  The elevation of Boston (my next marathon) is——>  141 ft.  

Do I think that the elevation change will help me out in the marathon—>  Yes, not a ridiculously huge amount but I do think it will help. 

Let’s talk about how altitude effects our running!  

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I have pretty much always lived at high altitude except for two instances:

-When I went to school in Hawaii for a bit.

-When I moved to San Jose, California.

In both instances, when I first moved from my high altitude area to these sea level areas I noticed a difference in my running.  It felt like I didn’t even need to breathe and that the oxygen just seeped into my body.  Maybe I am just a dramatic person, okay… I know that I am but running felt a lot easier for me when going from high to low altitude.  

When I lived in California for a few months and then came back to Utah to visit it felt like my lungs were going to explode.  It felt like I had lost my altitude training fairly quickly.  Two examples from my blog of how I felt going from running at sea level for a while and then running in Utah:

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When I moved back to Utah for good it took me about 2-4 weeks to feel like the altitude wasn’t bugging me anymore and that my lungs had adjusted to it.  I also think that I kept telling myself that adjusting to high altitude again would be extremely hard which didn’t help, that brain of ours is sure a powerful thing:)

What’s the science behind this?  How does the altitude really effect our body?  Am I extremely dramatic about this kind of stuff?  Yes.

I’ll let a few articles do the talking:

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One of the beautiful things about running is that our bodies adapt.  SO, if you do move or go to an area with high altitude after being used to running at a lower elevation, your body will adapt.  Stick with your running and allow your body some time to get used to the change and before you know it, running will be back to feeling great!!!  Go easy for the first few days and go on some walks to slowly adjust!

***Also, drink PLENTY of water (and limit caffeine and alcohol because they are diuretics) when dealing with adjusting to high altitude running… altitude running dehydrates you.  You can also talk to your doctor about taking an iron supplement to help!

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4 things from yesterday!!!

Brooke has mastered the climbing wall.

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A restaurant that gives you bread with jam and some chocolate for samples before your meal comes…

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I have been craving a chicken and pesto panini for a very long time.

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Our favorite book to rad together lately:

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Come run the Utah Valley Marathon or 1/2 Marathon with me this year!  Ryan Hall is going to be there too and the course is ridiculously beautiful!

For 20% off your bib—>  enter in the promo code HRG20

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How does altitude affect your running?  Have you noticed a big difference when you go to visit areas that differ greatly from where you live in terms of altitude?

What races are you currently signed up for?  Do you sign up for races far in advance or right before you run them?

What have you been craving lately?  

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96 comments

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I live and run in Florida but when I go home and try to run in the ‘hills’ of Tennessee, it kills me for the first few days!

My next race is the Sarasota Half Marathon where the only hill is a crazy long and seriously high bridge…but we running over the water and it’s beautiful!

Have a great weekend.

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I live at pretty close to sea level. I remember when I came to Utah last year I had such a hard time breathing! Not to mention I was running in SLC and basically had a hill on every block.

I had been craving avocado toast with an egg so I had that for lunch yesterday with a side of homemade tomato soup! It hit. the. spot.

I was going to head out for a run today but it’s -24F WITHOUT the windchill. Guess I’m inside today!

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I’m running my first race at altitude this summer…and it’s an ultra. Yes I’m nervous!

Schedule: Boston, Country Music Marathon, North Fork 50, VA Beacg Half, Flying Monkey Marathon, New York, St Jude Memphis

Craving: vegan chocolate chip cookies from whole foods!

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I’ve been signed up for Utah Valley for awhile! I’m excited! I have to plan out my races so I usually schedule in advance.

I live in KS where I am not at just under 2000ft and have raced several places in Colorado, anywhere from 5000-9000ft. I’ve been lucky to not notice any problems with altitude, but several other friends have.

I’m craving Froyo. Probably because I can’t have it for lent!

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Jam and chocolate? That is the best idea ever! I’m not signing up for any races until I am 100% injury free. Working on imbalances with my therapist and it’s the hardest work of my life.

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My last race, a half marathon, had a total elevation gain of 25 feet so I don’t think altitude affects my running much! ;) Some of my weeknight runs have an elevation gain of 10feet which is just because I run over a bridge!

I am signed up to run the Chicago Marathon for charity this fall! Until training begins I’m going to run a few 5Ks …. scary! haha

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Such a great and informative post! When I visited Salt Lake City for about a week a few years ago, I noticed a bit of a difference when I ran but nothing drastic. That might have been because I stuck to shorter treadmill runs though.
I like to register for races esrly in case they sell out! I’m currently registered for the St. Louis Go! Half Maraton in April.

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I’ve never trained at an altitude very different from where I live, so I have no idea how it feels! It’s something I’ve always been curious about though. I do think you’ll have an advantage for Boston.

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I’ve live in the Mile High City (aka Denver) for about 2.5 years and the altitude is still is a struggle some days! I do love when I go back home to NY to visit family because I feel like I have hulk lungs. Things I’ve noticed while living at a higher altitude are you CANNOT drink enough water, SPF is your BFF and one thing I wasn’t expecting was the effects of thin air on weight loss. crazy!

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I’m craving eggplant Parmesan.
I am mostly running close to sea level so when I went to run 5 back to back half marathons in Montana, Nebraska, north and South Dakota and Wyoming is was curious about how the elevstion change would affect me. But I think it was the extreme heat and cold temp changed (Wyoming was 90 and Montana was 40 deg) combined with running 5 halfs in 5 days that actually made me feel the struggle catching my breath. Although perhaps the elevation differences were s part of that too.
I’m supposed to be running a 10k trail run tomorrow.
I have the nyc half marathon mid March and the philly love run half end of March.
I’m registered for the nj marathon end of April but I think it’s going to end up being a half for me. I have missed over a month of training. Don’t think I can make that up.

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I usually sign up FAR in advance. Over-planner over here.

Lately I’ve been craving anything and everything salty. Popcorn with salty butter. yes.

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This is a great post – I love when you get more into the real details of running instead of just a bunch of pictures. Your life looks so fun and Brooke is so cute, but since this is a running blog, it’s always interesting to read more about actual running. This was of particular interest to me because I have never run at altitude – just here in Boston and then in the Bay Area. I’ve run to the top of some pretty high peaks and felt like my lungs were just WORKED after but that’s nothing like actually training at altitude. I think it’s going to help you in Boston even more than you think!

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That first picture is gorgeous! I love running because it takes you so many places and gives you amazibg experiences all while stretching and pushing your mind and body.

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I’ve never lived at altitude but whenever I’ve visited Colorado or somewhere at a a higher altitude, I notice a HUGE change in my breathing when I run. It becomes 10x harder, but I’m sure that if I moved there, I’d get to used to it. Hopefully the “easier” altitude will help you out at Boston!

And I’ve eaten out a lot recently with friends and have started feeling bleh, so I’m craving a giant, fresh, homemade salad and that’s exactly what I’m going to have for lunch :)

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Oh my goodness, I remember when I went to Colorado a few years ago and stepped outside for a run. I had no idea how much the altitude change would affect me, but I ran completely out of breath when I ran up the first hill on my route. I wasn’t sure I was going to make it through the whole run!

I’m craving a big, juicy cheeseburger right now. Must.have.

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The altitude totally effects me- and I have asthma. In Arizona running is so easy! Here it really depends on the day but I feel like I have to work harder.
So far I’m going the winter racing circuit 10 miler and half, legacy duathlon, Ogden half, wellsville duathlon, girls on the run 5k (I’m a coach), Huntsville half, spudman, Ragnar and wildflower pedal fest. I’ve thought about utah valley though! I still need another June race and maybe early July!

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I live at sea level, and I’m doing a stage race in the Rockies this summer. I can tell that’s going to fuuuuuun……. :/

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I absolutely noticed a difference during my first half marathon at Hershey Park! Hershey is in Pennsylvania up in the mountains and I used to running on Long Island at level with the ocean. I definitely struggled in my lungs and regulating my breathing during the first half of that race and felt it when I was finished for hours. I didn’t realize it then but came to learn what the feeling was from! My next race is not decided yet but leaning towards running the Fitness magazine half again in April.

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I never run anywhere that’s high altitude (and I’m pretty much at sea level where I live) but I’m sure it would be so hard! I would definitely need some time to adjust before I could race at a high altitude.

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My boyfriend (who is an INSANELY talented runner) and I went to visit my parents in Estes Park, CO two weeks before a marathon we were running. While we did not run nearly as many miles as we should’ve, both of us swear that running so much in the altitude so close to the race helped us perform better on race day. How much of that is mental? Who knows, but it sure felt good either way!

I’m scheduled for the Salem Black Cat 20 miler in a couple of weeks, and I was supposed to run the Hyannis Half marathon this weekend but it was canceled due to too much snow :( I also have the Cox Rhode Island Marathon in the beginning of May that I’m SUPER excited for.

Hope you have a great weekend and a good long run!

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I live in Estes Park! Hope you had a fun trip!

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I’m in Denver and have TOTALLY bookmarked you. Girl, it is COLD. Take good care.

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Here in Chicago it is -25 or -30 ish with the windchill.. so I cannot imagine running outside. I have never done a race–probably because I am wimp, but I love reading your blog because I can then live through your races.

I have lately wanted popcorn, kettlecorn, caramel corn, cheddar popcorn, and any kind of popcorn!!! Target has vanilla cupcake drizzled popcorn in the Easter section and also lemon-drop kettlecorn in the Easter section. YAY for Easter which is very very far away!

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I live at 7,000 ft and always bank of that helping me in races. My next race, the Phoenix Marathon, is at 2,000 ft, so it’ll be a huge difference. I’ve read a lot on altitude training since Flagstaff is such a destination for elite athletes to train. I truly feel like it’s made me a stronger runner to have spent the majority of my training for every race here.

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I’ve never had to deal with altitude.. big is very interesting and wonder how I would deal.
I usually sign up only a couple months before. I have a half marathon coming up in May, I’m pretty excited since I haven’t ran a race since October. I might sign up for another in April though. ..

I’ve been craving coffee.! Like everyday. Haha

Have a great day :)

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Having only ever lived in Florida and California, I’ve never had to worry about altitude. But I think it’s pretty cool you are training in the “harder” of the climates. Keep up the awesome work! Now, I’m off to teach a Les Mills BODYATTACK class, which will include all the running I do today. :)

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I’m not a runner (except in my dreams) but I am a certified book nerd…..and have to comment on the fact that I LOVE the fact that you read to Brooke so much!! And that she loves books right back! My kids are past the time of sitting in my lap while I read to them and to say I miss that time is an understatement. But I wanted to share a few of my kids (and mine!) favorite books during that time. You may already have them but if not, go get them now! :) You will like them as much, or more than Brooke! The all time favorites where the “Skippyjon Jones” books, all of them! We would all giggle reading them and I heard “again, momma” after each book was read. My son loved “Bark George” and would giggle every single time we read it. Priceless! There are so many others that we enjoyed but these were the tried and true….enjoy!

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I definitely notice differences in altitude, although I think transitioning to high altitude is more challenging than running at low altitude is easy. I spent a summer in Breckenridge, and training there was HARD! When I moved to SLC in 2008 I noticed the higher altitude but adjusted quickly. I just moved back, and I think that adjusting this time around has been a lot more difficult. I can’t wait for summer so I can start trail running at Alta.

I’m taking a break from racing for awhile, but I am running Canyonlands in a month- such a pretty course!

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I just signed up for my first 50km!! :)

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I’ve pretty much always run at sea level (the VA Beach/NJ coastal problems I suppose). The Utah Valley half would be so much fun but ahh the travel. I wish I could and you know Ryan Hall is my main man. ;)

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I went to Colorado last weekend (I live in Texas), and I got a nosebleed immediately! There was no way I was going to try to run in the mountains. We are going to Utah this summer, so hopefully I find some mental toughness by then. ;) I was wondering if you would post some more pics of your breakfasts. I’m trying to get my eating back on track for running, and I’m finding breakfast difficult. Breakfast foods seem to be either sugar or…eggs.

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I live in Texas so I NEVER have to deal with high altitude. When I went to Colorado on vacation I did notice a difference in light headedness and a little trouble breathing, and that was just walking around being a tourist! I can’t imagine having to adjust my running to that! You are tough!

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I recently read a book called The Sport’s Gene (the author has a TED Talk I came across that’s really interesting)- it’s all about how it is that athlete’s are still breaking records and getting stronger and faster. It’s a really good read, but there are definitely parts where I felt like I needed a degree in genetics. ANYWAY! The book discusses running a lot and talks about some of the world’s best runner’s not only training at high-altitude but having been born at higher altitude and as a result having larger lungs and a better ability to utilize oxygen.

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I live at 7,500 altitude in Colorado and I notice big changes when I run (or drink a beer!) at a lower elevation. Even dropping a couple thousand feet and going to Denver for a long run makes a difference. I so prefer to live at a higher altitude though – the air is clean and pure and it makes your body feel so good when you get a good workout in!

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OMG, the beer thing, too! I am in Northern Colorado so not as high as you but when we go to sea level I always say “time for an easy run and drinking more than I normally do….”

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I live in Calgary (just east of the rocky mountains), so I’m also at a high altitude. When I first moved here I kept getting nose bloods for the first couple weeks because of it.

Brooks looks so proud of herself at the playground.

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When I was 24, I spent 14 months training swimming with super fast teenagers at 7500 feet. I was wicked fast and had no trouble underwater kicking to win short course races. It was the most amazing thing ever.

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I am in Colorado so run at “a mile high”. When we go to Mexico, I love to get out and run because it does feel so much easier! I have been craving peanut butter–I always crave peanut butter :)

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I used to date a guy who lived in Colorado (I live in Texas), and just visiting him would give me elevation sickness. Whenever we would go on runs together, I would die. The elevation makes SUCH a difference! It felt like such a better workout though haha. I’m running the Rhythm and Blues 1/4 marathon the first weekend of March, and then the Dallas Rock ‘N Roll 1/2 marathon on March 22nd, and they added a 5K to it the Saturday before so I was like sure why not? Haha. I need to figure out my fall races still and maybe throw in a few summer ones too.

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A few years back I was at a conference in Denver and afterwards, some colleagues and I went and hiked up Mount Elbert – highest summit in the Rocky Mountains (14,440 feet). Ottawa, where I live, is just slightly lower than Boston…where we stayed in Colorado, before the hike, is just under 10,000…lying in bed at night, my heart was racing. The hike? Insane. The last 100m before reaching the top, I would have to stop and catch my breath after every single step. But wow, what an incredible experience and view!

So yes, I KNOW that you benefit by living and training where you do!! So awesome!

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I don’t think I’ve ever run at a higher altitude, I’m pretty close to sea level most of the places I’ve lived.

I’m signed up for the West Point Half Marathon at the end of March, and a couple of smaller, brand new half marathons, the Rhinebeck Hudson Valley Half in May and the Walkway Half in Poughkeepsie in June. I like to sign up with plenty of time to train well.

I have been craving ice cream like crazy lately. I always want more!

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I thankfully don’t get sick too easily from altitude, but when we hiked the Inca Trail we DEFINITELY underestimated how much it would affect us. We figured marathon runners = hiking would be easy peasy, but it was tough! Still a great time, but tough!

I’m a paranoid worrier. I always sign up RIGHT AWAY because I don’t want to risk anything selling out.

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I lived in Boulder, CO for a bit (coming from California coast) so it was a huge adjustment. I was also putting in quite a big volume of training so literally for the first month I was just exhausted. Swimming was the hardest because you can only take so many breathes! But coming back down to California, I felt like a rock star my first couple runs!

I definitely suggest for anyone racing at altitude to get there at the last minute. Even 10 days before could leave you feeling the altitude.

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I am living and training in Illinois. I plan on in the future running a few races in the “vacation races” series which would include some serious elevation changes. Not being able to be at the destination until the day before the race. Tips on training my body to handle such a drastic change in a super short amount of time?! P.S. these would also be my first marathons. :/

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I’m wondering the same thing. I’m planning a race at altitude later this summer (not as high as Flagstaff…I think it’s 4500 feet, but still, would I notice that change?) Starting to worry!

And it’s interesting because I’ve read (and Janae also said it here) that you should get to the destination ahead of time to get used to the altitude change…but then I also read that you won’t really feel the deleterious effects until 4 days in of altitude.

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I think it was always harder for me to run in Idaho than when I am at home in the South. I deal with exercise induced asthma (occasionally, not all the time anymore) but it is so much worse in cold weather bc it feels like I can’t get air in and when I do it is piercingly cold…..usually only lasts the first ten minutes of a run though and then I am fine. It made it so hard with cold and altitude in Idaho. I so much prefer heat and humidity to cold!

I sign up for the races I am super excited for as soon as I can! June 6 is my favorite one coming up………a half marathon in the farmland outside of Nashville!

And I have been craving Penn Station subs………..they are hot and delicious!

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I’m running the Mardi Gras Mambo 10k tomorrow in Baton Rouge & I’m signed up for the Double Down at the Louisiana Marathon in Jan. – 5K Sat & Half on Sunday. I usually sign up pretty far in advance to get the lower rate. Racing gets expensive!

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There are so many runners in Colorado!!! Colorado Baby. We rock.

And yep…we’re runnin’ at at LEAST a mile high. It feels awesome. And sometimes it doesn’t. But that’s neither here nor there. ;)

I want a cheeseburger.

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It’s always surprised me that humidity impacts me more than altitude. I can go from FL to Boulder and do a 20 miler with a smile because of the temp…but summers here, oye!

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I’ve been thinking about this a lot! I’m definitely motivated by competition so I race a lot, and plan them out well in advance. I was thinking about Big Cottonwood Marathon in September and the altitude is definitely on my mind (coming from Minnesota). Ever run that one? Or know anything about it? I’m currently running Big Sur and Grandma’s marathon, a handful of shorter races and some TBD fall marathon. Hopefully I get a BQ out of one of them :)

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I live at about 6800 feet and train anywhere from 6000 to 7000 feet (sometimes cross training as high as 10,000) but many of my races are at sea level. In the past I’ve always ran faster and easier in the races and I absolutely attribute that to no altitude!

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I remember hiking in Logan Canyon when we first moved to Utah and that killing me! Now that I’ve lived near sea level for so many years, I’d die if I returned to Logan to run the Top of Utah Marathon or Half! I have 12 races scheduled this year – ranging from 5K’s to half marathons.

Have a great weekend!

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Janae, are you running the UV half or full this year? I still haven’t decided.

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Your advantage from going from high to low at Boston is like legal blood doping! That’s awesome. Honestly, if I could predict your finish time at Boston, I’d say you’ll come in at 2:57:36. I think we should make bets. :)

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The altitude here is about the same as where you live. I do find that running at lower elevations makes the races seem so much easier and I feel so much faster. I’ve got the Napa Valley marathon in 9 days. Wish me luck, I haven’t ran in nearly a month b/c of IVF. Wish me luck, I hope to be pregnant and finish! After this race I’m signed up for the Boston marathon 5K in April and a half marathon in Lake Tahoe in June.

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Thank you sooo much for writing about elevation!! I just moved from Florida (at sea level) to Flagstaff, Arizona (7000 feet about sea level) a few months ago! My overall goal is to become best friends with Ryan and Sara Hall since they just moved here to train.

BUT running here has been difficult and frustrating. After a few months a can finally run three miles without pain in my lungs and I am slowly working my mileage back up. Any idea how long it will take to find my old pace and mileage?

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I can’t imagine having to switch altitudes! I know whenever we go to Tahoe, the altitude is so high it is SO HARD to just breathe while walking, let alone running!

xo

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Ohh I want to go to that restaurant that gives you pre-meal snacks! Yum!

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I’ve never run at altitude but experienced something similar when we moved from California to Hawaii – I felt like I was going to die because of heat + humidity in January! (drama!) But I did adjust. The body is an amazing thing.

Still trying to choose my next race. Pretty sure I want to do the Canyon City Marathon in November. (https://www.runrevel.com/rcc) Starting elevation = 5,134, ending elevation = 614!

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Just the topic I was thinking about the other day! I live in Colorado and am running Boston. I fly in to Boston on Friday night and was thinking….. how long will the high altitude training last for me….should I fly in Sunday instead? JK :) Lets just hope a few days won’t make a difference.
BTW just started reading your blog, and I love it!

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Thanks so much for commenting Kim! HAHAH I hope those few days don’t make a big difference… I get in Friday morning:) Hope to see you there?

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I would love to spend like 6-8 weeks at high altitude for part of a training cycle then race at sea level (which is where I live)!

No races on schedule yet since Boston is out.

In a ideal world I would love to run CIM at the end of the year…

Craving a chopped salad right about now :)

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My next race is the Diva Dash next month. I usually pick my races about a month out, but I would save some money, I’m sure, if I would plan them a little farther out.

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I live in the Bay Area and just visited Park City, UT for the first time last weekend! Oh man, the altitude really kills! Park City has some really hilly areas, so I felt like I got a crazy workout anytime I ran!

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I moved to Utah from Connecticut in August. At first the altitude was killing me (and the hills!) It took me a good 1-2 months to get used to it. Now (6 months later) i can happily run the bonneville shoreline without feeling like I just may collapse and die (truth that was my reality- even at flat liberty park!)

Thanks for sharing!
katie @ http://www.runningaragnar.com

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The only benifit of training at 7000 feet (where I live) is when I do races at lower elevation I feel like a speed demon! :)

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This is so interesting! I’ve never given elevation much thought but I live in NYC and often visit my family in Chicago, and always (always) run significantly better in Chicago. Interestingly enough, I just did some quick research and learned that Chicago is actually at a slightly higher elevation than NYC! I’m now wondering if the flatness of the midwest makes it easier for running than the rolling hills of Central Park :)

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I usually sign up for races in advance – only because some of the races sell out in a day! I am training for a 50 miler in May (Sun Mountain), a 50km in July (Broken Goat in Rossland, British Columbia, a trail relay in August and a Fall marathon in Berlin. I am craving chocolate right now :D

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I always forget how much I love pesto until someone mentions it and then I want it RIGHT THEN.

I am running the Mercedes Benz Half Marathon this weekend!! I rarely sign up for races in advance. Example: I registered for this race last week. Pretty last minute.

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I’ve never run in altitude but I really want to try sometime… and then I’d be exhausted in like 30 seconds, hahaha!

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This post was so great in so many ways. Let me count the ways:
1. LOL moments: Am I extremely dramatic about this kind of stuff? Yes.
2. Holy what? Seriously this exists? moments: Bread, jam and choco served pre-meal at a restaurant.
3. Wow – good to know moments: Taking iron supple. to help with loss of oxygen.

Happy Friday! It’s finally here!

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Your comment made me smile:) Thank you Jaime!

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Altitude most definitely effects my running! I went on a cruise to Mexico and couldn’t believe how easy my runs were :) Where did you go for lunch??? I want to sign up for the half in Vernal! You should too! Lately I have been craving carbs! Yum!

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I live at 1400ft elevation and just came back last week from AZ where my daughter lives and I was huffing and puffing there. My grand daughter was in her stroller and kept saying “I told you to go fast Grams!” Believe me I was trying.

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I live at 6300 feet and I LOVE to go on runs when I visit family in the Bay Area. I feel like superwoman!

Several years ago a couple of friends decided to do the Donner Lake Triathalon on a whim (it’s between 6,000 and 7,000′). It was just a sprint distance, so we didn’t exactly train very hard. I think in total we ran 1 mile, swam twice for a total of 30 minutes and managed to put slick tires on our mountain bikes. We showed up to the race in our cotton t-shirts with our heavy bikes and I swear one friend was wearing a regular fashion bathing suit like you’d wear to the beach. We were so intimidated by the hard bodies with bulging muscles and coordinated triathalon outfits and carbon fiber bikes. BUT, we ended up finishing in the top 10 in our age groups and I swear it was the altitude.

You’re going to rock Boston!!

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I have been craving so much sugar it’s not right!

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Bangs Friend!!!!! How is she?!

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She is so awesome! I get to see her next month:) I hope you have a great weekend Lindsay!

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Don’t forget that one year the Boston marathon was 95°. The winters been crazy cold and snowy here. It wouldn’t surprise me if the weather went crazy in the Spring as well. Don’t get me wrong I’m looking forward to some warmth but this is New England and you never know what you’re going to get. I hope to see you when you run. I’ll be cheering for you ツ

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I have been craving candy lately!!

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I live in Pagosa Springs, CO, so a little over 7,000 elevation. I could so tell when I was living in Missouri and came back to visit! Altitude killed! I never want to move to a lower altitude because I don’t want to deal with it! And it also makes me feel like a [email protected]$$.

I haven’t signed up for any races yet… I just can’t afford it right now =( I’m wanting this year to be my year of a marathon, but I haven’t been running too often so I’m afraid I won’t be able to do it…

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I’ve never really changed altitude and ran before – so no idea!

I am signed up for: Around the Bay 5K in Hamilton, ON, a 10K in early May, and both the 5K and 10K of Ottawa Race Weekend (one behind the other…with an hour off) wootwoot!

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Awesome post!!!!

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This is so interesting, I have never really noticed much difference in elevations probably because they haven’t been that extreme, but I know you’ve mentioned it before and it’s always intrigued me! Thanks for all the great articles!
Right now I am craving BROCCOLI! I haven’t had it in way too long for some reason! Must remedy ASAP ;)

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Oh my gosh – I would LOVE to run Utah…it’s a dream…if only I had the money and time and training.

Question: I do not live at altitude. I signed up for a half-marathon in altitude this summer…I’m getting worried now. I will only arrive the day before the race…am I going to be in trouble? Guess I can forget running a PB. Boo.

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Altitude definitely makes a difference in training….last year I lived and trained for my first marathon while I lived in Flagstaff, AZ (elevation: 7,000ft.) I raced the Rock n’ Roll marathon in Phoenix (sea-level) and feel like the long-runs at altitude really made the marathon seem a little easier (well, the first half at least. Nothing about a marathon is “easy”) ;)

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I live in Seattle, where I’m rarely above 200 ft in elevation! I went on a road trip down to California a few summers ago and stopped in Sunriver, Oregon to get a run in on their awesome bike trails. I. WAS. EXHAUSTED. Took me a few weeks to realize that that 3 mile run was such a doozy because of the elevation. Phew.

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That is higher than any “mountain” in Ireland. I have no idea how that would feel to run at that altitude.. You are so lucky of where you live and run..

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chocolate before a meal is a great idea!
My next race is lost creek 30k here in southern Oregon April 25, it’s gorgeous and I’m really looking forward to it!
Lately im craving creative smoothies! I’ve been using 100% pure carrot juice to make them lately instead of rice milk for a 100% fruit and veggie smoothie!

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I am no expert but have been involved with aviation for many years so I kinda watch this kind of stuff. Think about it-at about 18000 feet above sea level there is only about half the air and thus half the Oxygen as at sea level. So, doing the math you likely have at best 85% of Oxygen at 5000 feet above sea level as at sea level.

Just sitting and walking , especially when we are young, we do not notice it, our bodies are amazing. But put it through some stress and we probably get a lot closer to oxygen debt sooner when we go to altitudes without any time to adjust.

At only 2000 feet or so the fresh crispness of the mountain air is so awesome we may never notice it, but at my age of 66, I would be feeling a bit anxious at times just walking around at 10,000 feet.

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I live in Florida, and have been here for almost 10 years; when we go up north to visit family (Illinois and/or Pennsylvania) I always feel like I’m a stronger runner. Out of all the training runs I did for the WDW Marathon, the one that stands out as the best was one done in PA over Christmas break.

Great post!

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Pesto is one of the most delicious things every made. We are having some tonight in fact. I think there was a week when I had pesto in some configuration about every day.

I am signed up for the Chicago Spring Half so far so I guess I had better work on that distance running again!

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I live and run most of my races in Florida, which is practically at sea level. I’m traveling to Seattle in September and plan to do a Tough Mudder out there- from what I’ve read, Seattle is supposedly up to 500ft elevation. So I’m not entirely sure how this will go, but I hope I don’t get too bad of elevation sickness! I’m also addicted to caffeine so I’ll have to try to drink less of it by September- and add in more water.

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I’m signed up for the Utah Valley Half! I’m in my second week of training after bruising my heel bones and it’s going well so far.

I’d love to meet you in June!

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I just signed up for my first race since having my twins! May 3 in Philly, a 10 miler. I’m so excited! I started with a novice plan and am barely squeezing that in, but I’m glad to have a running goal again.
I am thinking about signing up for the RnR Philly which they just announced is October 31. It could be really fun (so many costumes!), and signing up early makes it much cheaper!

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I am signed up for the Huntsville Marathon (my first one ever!) and I am running a 15k on Saturday out by Saltair! Not many more that I will do.

Have you run the American Fork Half before?

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