What I am most afraid of…

32 WEEKS….8 MONTHS….We are getting closer to August 24th!!!!

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I haven’t had too many changes this week besides I am dreaming more and more about her and what she is going to be like.  It makes me really excited to go to bed.

I had a doctor’s appointment this week and everything looks great.  Instead of going to the docs once a month now I will be going every 2 weeks.  Running has been feeling really good and making me think that I will be able to run for at least a few more weeks if not the entire pregnancy.  I get slower each week but that is okay with me as long as I still get to do it.

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Onto the topic of this post:

I feel like I am pretty good with kids.  I now have a total of 15 nieces and nephews that I am with a lot and have learned a lot through watching their parents raise them.  I babysat throughout my teenage years and was a nanny in college.   I know how to change diapers, how to spoil them rotten and how to make them laugh so I am not too nervous about that kind of stuff.

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There is something that I am really nervous about:

Breastfeeding.

I know that I don’t have to breastfeed and if it doesn’t exactly work out then it is totally okay to use formula but I am just nervous about figuring out the whole thing.  I have heard so many stories about it hurting, taking a long time to get a hang of, Mastitis, not having enough supply etc. that I get really worried about it.  Please tell me that this scared other people too!

I feel like this section of the blog has turned into more of a forum where I beg for help from you guys but I kind of like it like that.  So, let’s get discussing mkay?

Did breastfeeding come natural to you?  What advice do you have for me?  Any good books/websites that you recommend I read? Did running/working out effect your supply?

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133 comments

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You look adorable :)

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Breastfeeding did not come easy for me. When my first had difficulty in the hospital, I immediately thought he was starving and started feeding him formula. Then days later I was crying and frustrated that he still couldn’t get it. It was very important to me to breastfeed, so I called a lactation consultant. It was a long process, but eventually we got him to nurse and supplemented with formula. Around 5 months, he stopped wanting to nurse, and went 100% formula.

When I had my second 16 months later I knew more about the process. I knew that it sometimes takes awhile for babies to get the hang of it, and for some a few days for milk to come in. I had the support of an online message board community who knew so much about the subject and encouraged me to stick with it. It did take us a few days to get it right, but we did. She was 100% bf, as was her younger sister.

If it is important to you, you can and will make it work. Just know that, and trust yourself.

I found Dr. Sears to be really helpful.

I’ve done both formula and bf and can tell you that bf is way, way easier.

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Oh – and I didn’t run when I was nursing, but I did need a ton of more calories (and the post-pregnancy pounds melted away fast). So running + nursing will require even more eating (one of the positives!)

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I agree with everything! I just wanted to add that I am currently breastfeeding and running and you will also need a very supportive, tight bra! Especially once baby is sleeping through the night and you are running in the morning before she gets up!

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I was super scared of breastfeeding! Seriously BF twins sounded more like a game of Jenga than reality. I read books, I had massive prop pillows, I had industrial pumps. I was basically ready for BF battle …
But when I had my twins we were in the NICU and unable to access (or think clearly) about everything I had planned for. We worked it out, the 3 of us. Honestly you and your little girl will team up and make it happen, I’m sure of it.
The one piece of advice I have is to ask EVERYONE in the hospital for assistance. There should be a lactation consultant and a bunch of nurses who can give you tips. Small tweaks, like you hand placement on the baby’s neck can make big differences.
And as for running affecting my supply, it never did. As long as I was drinking a bunch of water all the time. I did however have one twin unable to handle my milk post running – apparently the lactic acid you generate can also come through in the milk and be hard for sensitive tummies. I remedied this by pumping and dumping my post run milk.
Phew, long winded but takeaway … nerves are normal but your instincts will prevail!!

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You are so stinkin’ cute! I hope you are able to run till the very end!

Breastfeeding is tricky getting started sometimes, even when you’ve done it before. Don’t be afraid to get help and even find a lactation consultant after you’re home from the hospital if you need help, that’s what saved me with my first. Just remember that babies are programmed to lose a little weight in the beginning, all they need those first few days is colostrum, so don’t panic when your milk doesn’t come in right away. I think the biggest thing is just keep trying! For me my first was a difficult journey but it was so worth it in the end. Hopefully baby will be a great nurser and it will come easily for both of you!

Oh, and that half second clip from Inside Edition was on The Soup! lol Such a proud moment. *tear* ;)

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Ohhhh yes, I was afraid as well. Things were difficult with my first; but I’m lucky in that my hospital is known for it’s lactation support and is very pro-BF. They don’t even have a nursery. I ended up using a shield that helps the baby latch on – kinda like putting a bottle top on yer boobie! That did the trick and I slowly weaned him off the ‘shield’ and he was 100% BF for 9 months. Then zero issues with my second – the first one broke me in :)
Just try to relax, and be patient, that’s the hardest thing to do when you’re a brand new mom – but that’s my best advice! That and ask for a lactation consultant if you need one.

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I was scared. I wanted so bad to breastfeed. So I read everything the doctors gave me, everything I could get my hands on. Be prepared for it to no work at first but be willing to keep trying and tweaking till you find what works for you and for the babe. And everyone is different. Even with each of my kids I had to do it differently because they were different people. So be willing to try something and if it doesn’t work, it’s ok, just keep adjusting. I personally believe because I went into it with that attitude with my first she latched on and ate just find right from the beginning. I was shocked! Good Luck! Oh, and I wasn’t really running, but I was in school at the time. That should count, right?

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Sorry I don’t have kids so I can’t answer your questions but I just needed to say YOU LOOK SO FREAKING CUTE!!!!!

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Totally different with every baby. My first took a little while (like months) to get the hang of feeding especially in public (i.e. church). They hadn’t come out with the “hooter hiders” then, so I was stuck trying to keep a blanket over me (which she would push off every time). My second (a boy) was not a nurser. I struggled for 6 weeks and he just wouldn’t latch on. My third was a dream! I loved nursing (something I thought would never happen)!!

My MIL told me before my first baby, that I would definitely get Mastitis and that everyone got it. It scared the living “you-know-what” out of me! It never happened. I never even got cracked or bloody. I wouldn’t worry too much… you will be fine! :)

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No breast feeding advice here, but glad to see you’ve been able to stick with running this long! And I second the comments about you being one cute pregger.

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Breastfeeding is something you will never regret doing for your child. I have two B.f. Kids with the first baby it hurt badly for a week, I got one breast infection (mastitis) at 6 weeks then another at seven months, but was able to prevent both those things with the second baby through proper latching and knowing the early signs of Mastitis (Cold/flu type symptoms) then preventing it early.
It was difficult when with my second child I got a spinal headache and couldn’t get out of bed for 13 days, I couldn’t do anything but i was able to Breastfeed her which made me feel not so withdrawn from her. To be really honest it was so hard at times and it was a real treat when I could get my partner to take on a night feed with formula once or twice a week, but so many women go through the same thing you don’t need to feel alone and there’s some great advice from other women when you need it:-)

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I was born at 7 months, and I can’t believe how small you look for 8 months!!! I You’ll probably pop soon — keep the pictures coming:)

I’m just an Auntie & God Mommy to many, so I’m no help on the breastfeeding topic. However, I’m sure it will come naturally. DEFINITELY visit my friend’s website — she has a “Breastfeeding Stories” tab which will really help address your concerns —> http://islestyleliving.blogspot.com/p/breast-feeding-series.html

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The only thing I can tell you about breastfeeding is that “not having enough supply” is a myth that just won’t get away because even doctors and nurses keep telling to people that it is possible to not have enough milk for the baby. Actually, it is not (unless you are one of the very very rare cases where due to a medical reason it is not possible).
Producing milk for the baby works like supply and demand. If you demand more milk (i.e. put your baby to your breast more often even if there’s not that much milk) your body will start to produce more milk. You just need to be patient about it. Your boobs aren’t a fast food restaurant. It takes a while until your body adjusts to it. Just be patient. It will be fine!

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There actually are cases where a mom doesn’t produce enough milk for her baby and medical conditions are not involved. My mother wasn’t producing enough milk when I was breastfeeding and she had to put me on formula. She was extremely tired with three other kids and I was losing weight so the doctor told her to feed me formula.

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Thanks for your reply, Patty. The exact same thing happened when I was a baby. The doctor told my mum she didn’t have enough milk for me, so I was put on formula. That happened to many many people who are now in their 20s or older. That was just the way it was done back then. The thing is, most mums didn’t even try long enough. If babies lose weight, feeding formula in addition to trying to breastfeed would be an option.
However, I’m not one of the people who says breastfeeding is the only option there is and formula is hurting the baby. I totally get that a mum can’t spend months trying to breastfeed, especially if there are other kids who want attention as well. I’m just saying: Almost every woman can breastfeed and can “train” her body to produce enough milk. However, nobody HAS to breastfeed, of course. It’s a personal decision.

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I agree, Katie. I hear so many moms that say, their baby always wants to nurse. It’s not uncommon to nurse every 2 hours. Breastmilk is not as filling as formula. When babies want to nurse often, it makes the moms think they are not producing enough milk, and the moms resort to using formula. This does not help their milk supply. Then there’s the moms who start dieting right away and are not eating enough calories to sustain a milk supply.

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I breast fed for seven months but almost gave up the first week.
It didn’t come naturally and I had troubles getting him to suck properly. I ended up with blood blisters on my nipples. All it took was one midwife to show me a different way and within a day things were so much better.
I loved the bond and the closeness it brought us and also the convenience. No sterilizing bottles or measuring formula.
The important thing is to do what is best for you and the baby. Stressing about milk just because you have your heart set on breast feeding will just make the both of you upset.
It’s one of those things you can’t predict or prepare for until she is here. Either way you will make a great mom x

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I wish people had told me more about breastfeeding before I had my first! We spent so much time learning about pregnancy and the birth, then he came and it was “off you go good luck!” It can be difficult or easy, but I think the most important thing is that you decide what YOU want to do. The discomfort is temporary and there will always be people who are willing to help you work through issues. I had a terrible case of thrush in my milk ducts that was some of the worst pain I’ve ever felt, but I knew no matter what that I wanted to nurse my baby. It took 3 months of taking daily Diflucan, lots of pumping and some formula supplementation but we got through it and I nursed him for over a year. The best thing anyone told me during that time ( a Le Leche League breastfeeding consultant) was “You are doing the best you can, and the best for your baby by taking care of yourself”. And know that there are AWESOME resources here in the Bay Area for you when you move out this way :)

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Breastfeeding does take some work and practice, it’s not as easy as you might think. That said, it is also one of the most rewarding things you’ll ever do. The first 2 weeks are the hardest, if you can make it through that you’ve pretty much set yourself up for success. The book, “The Nursing Mother’s Companion” by Kathleen Huggins was my breasfeeding bible. This booked taught me the skills I needed to successfully nurse by son for 18 months. Buy the book and skim through it before the baby is born. When you go into labor and go to the hospital take the book with you and start reading it in earnest as you start nursing. The book answers most of your questions/problems as they come up. I also recommend taking a breastfeeding class at your hospital before you deliver and have the number for La Leche League on hand for after you get home incase you have problems or questions. Also, take full advante of the lactation consultant at the hospital, they are there to help you. You can do it – it’s totally worth it!

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I have no advice, but I did have to tell you something funny … you and Billy were in my dream last night! Please don’t think I’m crazy haha! I was running a half marathon and Billy was running it, too. You were watching because you had gotten too pregnant to run haha! So random! ;)

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It’s not hard!! (ok, it can be) but it’s SO worth it!!! Read the book “so that’s what they’re for.” and don’t give up. You can do it!!! It’s so much better for your baby, and creates a bond between you that formula can not. And think of all the extra calories you can eat if you nurse. (more than when you’re pregnant I think!!) so read that book and stick it out through the beginning hard part and you won’t regret it!!

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I nursed all 3 of my kids. First thing…bookmark this site: http://www.kellymom.com I was on kelly mom multiple times per day with my second because I didn’t know if certain things were ok or normal. I only nursed 3 weeks the first time because I was young and misinformed. I nursed my last 2 babies for 11 months each. They never took a bottle. Went from boob to sippy cup. Kelly mom has all the resources you need. Second thing: Get Lansinoh and apply it after you nurse EVERY time. This will prevent chapped/cracked/bleeding nipples. Third: It will hurt, but only for a few weeks. Then it will be second nature. Think about the benefits for your baby and how much money you are saving, not to mention the extra 500 calories you are burning! Fourth: Read as much as you can beforehand. So many people will give you uneducated info. Educate yourself. Last: Yes, you may get mastitis or a plugged duct. Unfortunately, once you get mastitis, you are more prone to get it again. I dealt with this. It’s easy to resolve. Good luck!!

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Breastfeeding came naturally to my first baby! I’ll admit that I was so lucky she knew how to latch on like a champ. Plus, my husband gently suggested that I position her so that she didn’t have to turn her head (duh, right?).

The next two were progressively harder. I suspect it was in part that the first was 5 days overdue and the others were 1-week-early c-sections, plus the third was a boy.

The lactation consultants in the hospital where I delivered were not just useless–they were kinda mean. Feel free to ignore them if that’s the case, and find either a) a girlfriend who breastfed successfully or b) a laid-back lactation consultant outside the hospital who will help you and baby girl learn together (I did this with my son, and it made a huge difference in a matter of hours). High pressure from someone trying to help will only make it harder. Someone who says “See if this is comfortable for her” or “Will she open her mouth wider this way” is so much better than “No! You have to press her on firmly.”

It’s key to find a groove that works for you and your baby, not to follow textbook steps to breastfeeding, especially from a dril seargeant! :)

Also, pumping breastmilk takes some getting used to, but it can be a great way to keep up feeding breastmilk even if the baby has a hard time latching. I bought an electric pump with my first, but I was terribly intimidated by it for some reason. I ended up pumping with an Avent handheld for months, finding it gentle enough to let me relax and effective enough to get milk quickly. Plus, it’s silent, so I used it at the office.

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I think bf is different for everyone–I was sure I was going to love it, I did not and Addy wasn’t such a fan either. I tried pumping (as Addy preferred a bottle) and I had low milk supply (which I think was from starting up running again) I got overwhelmed, etc. But I didn’t want to quit either because I felt so guilty. Finally a friend told me ‘its okay to quit’ I quit at 6 weeks and for me and Addy it was the best decision. I did not see how depressed I was. Addy took the bottle and formula so much better than breast milk. I was happy and wasn’t crying/yelling/emotional every second of the day. I think bf is a very personal decision and while I know breast milk is the best, you truly can’t judge another persons decision and what works best for them.

If we do have another child, I will try breast feeding again because I am still happy that Addy got 6 weeks of breastmilk, but i am not going to beat myself up if it doesn’t work out again.

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Same here!! My body was not built to breastfeed…more specifically, my nipples are just not right. We used shields, nipple pumps to make them longer and easier for baby to latch to…without success.

We did this for six weeks before my postpartum anxiety was so so bad and centered around feeding my child that we went cold turkey to bottle and never looked back. I pumped for another month and was 50/50 bm to formula, but I work full time and was not going to pump at work.

Baby wasn’t fazed in the least. The pressure I was putting on myself to force the breastfeeding issue was far worse than anything else. My little guy went to the bottle without a thought.

For some women breastfeeding will not work, for a variety of reasons. Expect this to be the hardest thing you will ever do. Get lots of support. Educate yourself about things that can hinder the process (like having poor nipples!!) and if bfing exacerbates post partum anxiety , there is no judgement in stopping! The most important thing to do is feed your baby. Breast or bottle!!

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I just have to say I think these posts are very important. Mommy guilt is so strong, but a baby would rather have a happy mom than one who is depressed and feeling pressure from external sources. I was able to nurse until my little girl was 6 months, but it took every ounce of energy I had to get to that point, and bottom line I was miserable to make it work. With this pregnancy I’ve promised myself that I won’t put so much pressure on myself and truly try to embrace the newborn phase, and just as importantly that I will take care of me!

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I have no breastfeeding advice for you (other than that it worked out well for both of my sisters even though they were scared about it, too!), but I just had to tell you how beautiful you look! I can’t believe you’re already 32 weeks – amazing! Thinking about you all the time, sweet Janae. xo

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Oh Janae,
Just give it a chance and don’t be scared. I will be honest it did not work out for me. I don’t know what the problem was, but none of my kiddos would nurse. Was it me and being stressy I don’t know, but go in with a positive attitude and you may have a really different experience. Also don’t be afraid to become really friendly with your lactation nurse. They will answer your questions and many hospitals have one available all of the time even after you go home. Now….on the flip side if it doesn’t work out, it doesn’t work out and it is OKAY! All four of my kids are bright, not sickly and have turned out okay. I can’t believe it has been 32 weeks, you are such a cutie! xoxoxoxo!!!

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J–YOU can do it and I HIGHLY recommend it–benefits galore for you and baby. Whatever you do when you first start, don’t give up! and DO NOT put a bottle nipple in that baby’s mouth at first. Stick with BF. Get help if you need it. You can do it. It is/was one of the most awesome experiences of having children for me! e

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I agree that nipple confusion can create problems but it’s ok if you have to give her a bottle if she won’t latch. Especially if you are worried she is hungry – it can be really stressful to think you are starving your baby.

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Breastfeeding was not easy at first. My daughter wouldn’t latch on and once my milk came in and I was engorged I decided to use a nipple sheild. I had to use that until she was 5 months old and she finally figured out how to nurse without it. I regret using the sheild and wish I had just tried harder at the beginning to get her to latch. She is now 13 months old and still nurses a couple of times a day. Stick to it, I’m sure you and your sweet daughter will figure it all out together! Don’t be afriad =)

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I nursed both my kiddos without any significant problems. I used the Kellymom site a lot for help/reference, but we also attended a breast feeding class at the hospital prior to the birth of my first child. It was so helpful and made me feel so much more comfortable when it was time to nurse. Do the research now… When you’re tired and stressed with a newborn, you’re not going to feel like reading, etc!

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Like everyone said, for most, it is not easy. I had a lot of problems in the beginning and didn’t really start to get the hang of it until the 6-8 week mark. Now that Ashton is 4.5 months old, we are totally in sync and its great. I think having a supportive husband for me was key, especially at 2 am when the baby was screaming and wouldn’t latch. My husband keep telling me that we could do this and work through it. I also used a lactation consultant in the hospital which I 100% recommend and the I had her come to the house once to reinforce what I was doing. It definitely takes time, but its worth it. I love that bonding time, the convenience and it also saves us a ton of money (more race registrations!!! :) ). And worse case, if you can’t, there is nothing wrong with formula!

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I don’t have kids yet, but this is something that stresses me out a lot too. Good luck!

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I never worried too much before my son was born & he took to the process without any issues. Unfortunately, I wasn’t producing enough for him & 3 days after he was born, we had to start supplementing — I tried for a couple of months, but he just never got enough from me, so eventually, we stopped trying. It was hard for me (as a type-A) not to feel like I failed, but ultimately, I know I did what I had to in order to let him thrive. He’ll be 5 in August & I can honestly say that I don’t have any regrets. My point being, try not to worry – there will be A LOT of people to support you, give you advice if there are any issues. Given your history (which mimics mine) I’d say the biggest thing you can do is to make sure you’re getting enough calories in so that you can produce what your little girl will need. It sounds easy, but when that little angel is sleeping, you’ll have a chance to eat or sleep….9 times out of 10, you’re going to choose sleep :-)

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You have 15 nieces and nephews?? Holy cow! I don’t have any! Then again, I’m the only one married from my or my husband’s side of the family.

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You’re going to be such a great mommy!

Breastfeeding was hard for me and my kids, but I heard that it comes naturally for others. I still wanted my kids to get the benefits of breastmilk, so I pumped with both my kids and gave it to them in a bottle.

My son was premature and I had to seperate all the milk I pumped because the milk that comes out right away is more nutritious. Who knew!

I say do what feels natural, and what you feel is right.

My SIL was unable to breastfeed because of medical reasons and felt so bad. But it wasn’t her fault and if your baby needs to have formula then that’s what’s best for them.

You are due on the same day as my other SIL – too funny!

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i loved nursing!! (nursed both of my kiddos until they were almost 2!)
it was hard at first..but once I got the hang of it, it was so natural. My tip: commit to doing it for 8 weeks. After that, you can give up if you want (but you probably won’t want to).

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Such a cute lil belly you have there!

I breastfeed both of my girls, the first for 17 months and the second for 13 months. It took a couple days with the first to get a good latch and it was pretty frustrating, but once I got the hang of it everything was fine. There were some bumps in the road (mastitus being one), but I am so happy I decided to stick with it. With my second it was easier, however, she has food allergies and I had to go on super restrictive elimination diets, so it was still difficult. However, I didn’t give up and again I was glad I stuck with it. I also ran my first half marathon less than a year after giving birth to my second daughter while I was still nursing, so running and nursing is definitely possible!

Good luck to you and try not to be scared, it sounds like you have done your research, so just be sure to have a good support system in line for breastfeeding and everything will work out fine! :)

if you ever want any nursing advice feel free to e-mail me!

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Ohmygosh, you are the cutest pregnant last ever.

Ok. On to breastfeeding. I think that the stories of breast feeding hardship outweigh the positive ones. I mean how often do people just come out and say, “breast feeding is going GREAT! I love it! Yay!” Hardly. Ever.

The truth, at least for me, is that it’s a little difficult for everyone. Having a baby attached to you 24 hours a day is tough. Physically, yes. But it’s also emotionally and socially difficult. I wasn’t prepared for some of those side effects, but I worked through them and it’s better now (my daughter is 5 months now).

Some things that helped me: the book Mama Knows Breast, the website Kellymom.com, and asking my breastfeeding friends lots and lots of questions. Oh, and for the record, I haven’t noticed any trouble with my supply and running, and I just went through a half marathon training cycle.

There’s so much I could say, but I don’t want to hi jack your comments entirely. Feel free to email me anytime, though! Especially since we’re both teachers – pumping in the classroom is uh…interresting!

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Hi Janea! I haven’t ever commented on your blog before but I read it daily :) I am a new mom – my son was born on April 13, so here’s my two cents on breastfeeding. It was actually what I was most nervous about (not labor and delivery; labored and pushed naturally at a birthing center, then had to go to the hospital for a csection). The first several days of nursing were really difficult – dealing with recovery, learning how to take care of my son, having sore/bloody nipples and one nipple being inverted, and making sure baby boy had a good latch. I also had a mild case of thrush. But after a couple of weeks (and the blessed use of nipple shields!!), things got better. I had planned on nursing my son til about 6 months or so, but because I have to be back in the office on July 30th, I’ve already started weaning him to drink formula. Now, I only nurse baby first thing in the morning and for his last feeding at night. He is a healthy, thriving boy! Don’t be scared about breastfeeding. You can do it! Just keep in mind that you’re new at it and so is your baby. You both have to take time to learn how to do it :) Talk to a lactation consultant and talk to your friends who have nursed their babies. Having support helps so much. And making sure your husband supports you in your decision to nurse.

Good luck with everything and I look forward to reading more about you and your baby’s progress! God bless you!

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Best Book Ever: Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (it’s a LLL book!) http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0345518446?ie=UTF8&tag=nycrunningmam-20&creativeASIN=0345518446
There is a ton of helpful information in there.

Just a few things:
– Take the book to the hospital with you. Even though you will have done your hw beforehand, you will be exhausted, nervous, etc holding your baby for the first few times trying to bf. It’s great to have as as handy reference.
– Don’t be afraid to ask for help from the nurses in the hospital. AJ was latching on incorrectly for the first day and my boobs were bleeding. I cried every time he tried to nurse (which was like every hour). I finally got the courage at 2am the first night to walk to the nurses station. Two nurses came in and watched and helped me. I thought I would be embarrassed about whipping out a boob in front of strangers but it’s different when it comes to bf’ing. I can’t explain it.
– Have a few gfs that you can turn to for advice. My sister bf successfully for 2 years and my cousin for 18 months. They were my resources during the first few months – anytime I had a question about letdown, leaking, supply, weight gain, etc.

It’s a scary time in the beginning. You are worried that you aren’t doing it right, that he/she isn’t eating enough, etc. There’s no real way to tell how much they are actually eating b/c it’s not like you have a bottle in front of you. Just know that if they have “x” number of wet diapers and are pooping, you BOTH are doing great.

Last thing. The first few days may be tough, but after that, it’s FREAKING amazing. Honestly, I would never ever trade bf’ing my son for anything else in the world. Other than having baby #2, the next thing I’m most excited about is bf’ing again. It was the best decision for us.

PS. I am always here if you have questions =)

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This is the first time I’ve commented on your blog, but I look forward to reading it each day.
I fully understand your anxiousness about nursing. My mother nursed both my sister and I for nearly a year each. Apparently she was a nursing rockstar! Things didn’t come as easy for me. The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&tok=f7btOi4VZeTl9VhRl6VvwA&cp=10&gs_id=5u&xhr=t&q=the+womanly+art+of+breastfeeding&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1600&bih=757&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=1538799370685984865&sa=X&ei=-qztT9PuKqSu0AHI_8HPDQ&sqi=2&ved=0CFUQ8wIwAA) is a good book that has a LOT of helpful tips. Take them for what you wish. From what I understand, every baby is different. It’s important to relax and find your groove with each other. Do what’s best for you. Our hospital provided walk in hours for instruction on breastfeeding, so if you can find something like that, you can get free help from someone that really knows what’s up.
I think the hardest part for me was the guilt I felt. I didn’t love nursing because it was tough for me. And I felt guilty about that. But when it became clear that it was time to move one from nursing completely (after 12 weeks, for us) I felt guilty about that too.
Looking back I am glad I gave it my all and I know next time around that I won’t sweat it too much. Healthy Happy Baby and Mama are the most important thing. Children learn what they live.
Best of luck. It is sure to be the most amazing thing you have ever done.

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Get nipple guards! My sis in law used them for both her kids and told me about them…im investing in a few for when I have this baby this fall!!! I heard it helps with the pain of breastfeeding.

PS you look so cute pregnant!!

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I tried really hard to bf but my milk didn’t come in till baby boy was 12 days old… and at that point I was only producing 1tsp a day. It was an incredibly emotional experience and I eventually decided that formula would be best for both of us. I think the most important thing to remember is to do what is best for the two of you. There is no need to feel guilty is you want to formula feed, even if that’s your only reason. Your decision has to be best for your baby, you as an individual, and you as a mom. In my experience, the emotional side of it all did not allow me to be the best mom I could be until I finally decided to formula feed. There are pluses to both!

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There are so many things you can read and people you can get advice from, which is all really great but you just have to go with how it’s working for you and baby. Every woman is so different.
I nursed Sam for only 7 weeks and I had so much guilt/stress/crying over everything the whole time because it just was not working for either of us and my milk production was pretty much not there. I can tell you it was so hard to enjoy him as a newborn because I was so caught up in having to breastfeed, that it took over all my thoughts and actions. As soon as I got over that and we switched to formula, I was a 100% better Mom and I felt better overall. No more stress, I just let it go and was OK with how it went.
Sam is as happy and healthy as can be. He was on formula from 2-12 months.
Now, with baby #2 I want to try as hard as possible to make it work, but I won’t guilt myself or make myself stressed to the point I did last time. The first week or even weeks can be hard, but the reward I know is worth it! Not spending money on gobs of formula would be nice, too :) And the bonding time…there’s nothing like it.
I would suggest letting Billy give her one bottle of breast milk at least once a day. We did that with Sam so that Dan could have that bonding time with him before bed each night. It was SO worth it to get him used to someone else feeding him in case I had to be gone.
Good luck and however it works out, is what’s best for you and your little family!

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I managed a year with my first. And the first six weeks were hard. My motto was I just want to do it through tomorrow (similar to how I run till the next corner)

We used some formula too because I needed help so my husband would give a bottle of formula while I pumped at bed time. Then he had a bottle for a night time feeding.
Just remember to relax and drink ALOT of water/juice/lemonade.

I read the la leche league book, The Womanly Art of breastfeeding.
So of it was a little extreme for me (some of the theory and diets) but it had great diagrams for how to stick the baby on.
Thier website is llli.org.

Anything you do that works for you, your baby and your family it the right choice:)

GOOD LUCK you will be a GREAT mom!

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Breast feeding was something I was never worried about. I had heard it could be difficult but I just thought it was ‘natural’ so his hard could it be? Ya. Hard. Lol. I have yet to be successful at it with my kids. I have horror stories that no pregnant woman needs to hear. It was so frustrating though cause my mom and sisters never had ANY problems. I had SO much guilt. I ended up pumping ans giving them bottles.until 6 months and after that we switched to formula.
Just know if you struggle, it is so common. Don’t let other people make you feel.guilty or bad about any choices you make for you and your baby (not just about breastfeeding either).
I had a VERY plentiful milk supply ;) even while running, but I always noticed a drop.if I was running and really trying to diet to lose the baby weight (which was lame) . But again, that was me. Most people drop weight like crazy just by nursing alone…not me, I hold on to it until.I am done. Lol. Go figure, right?

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I nursed my daughter and there were definitely tough points, but once we got through those (they were all pretty early on) it was so much easier and more convenient than making bottles! My advice is to expect some trouble and to have some support in place for when that time comes – I went to a really great nursing group at my hospital where I got help from their lactation experts and other moms and that helped a lot. It can be tough going at the outset but once you get in a groove it’s great!

As for supply, I found that having a lot of steady demand really helped mine. I don’t know if you’ll need to pump, but I did and I kept a pretty steady schedule of pumping and tried to skip as little as possible. If you didn’t pump, I think that nursing regularly or whenever baby’s hungry would achieve the same goal. I also pumped in the morning before I nursed – I read somewhere that because the baby is really efficient at drawing out milk she would still get milk even though I’d pumped. She always did and I think that helped a lot with banking enough for bottles because you have so much built up from overnight.

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Why, yes, I DO know a great book – I’m so glad you asked! ;-) I adore this book so much that even though I’ve only had the 2 children to prepare for, I have read this book AT LEAST 4 times. Every time I go to loan it out, I start wanting to read it again. It’s “So That’s What They’re For” by Janet Tamaro. It’s great and is what made me so passionate about b/feeding. What she says is if you’re doing it right, it’s not gonna hurt. Now I can’t agree with that 100% but if you can just give it 3 weeks, it gets awesome after that! I loved, loved, loved the closeness of it. My first b/f til she was 13 mths and my 2nd til he was 15 mths. It becomes less time-consuming the older they get also. Towards the end, they were only feeding first and last thing of the day. Formula is the best scientists can do but it’s not the same at all as what your body can make! A cool thing too is whatever sick germies you’re exposed to (and therefore baby is being exposed to too), your body is making antibodies that the baby gets fed so this = a less sick baby! There may be problems (I experienced EVERY SINGLE ONE except i never had a breast absess, thank goodness) but it was so worth it that I put up with using a Supplemental Nursing System due to low supply with the first one and having shots for mastitis for the FIVE times i had it with the 2nd, but seriously when they gaze up at ya and sometimes unlatch to give ya a smile while your giving them what NO ONE else can give them, it’s awesome. Okay, excuse me while I go cry in my pillow b/c my youngest is heading to kindergarten and now I need a baby to hold! ;-) Go to Amazon and get that book!!!!!!!!!!

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All the books will say this too, but a big diff for my kids with supply was we were sticking a pacifier in the firstborn’s mouth and my 2nd refused one so I BECAME the human pacifier. Guess with which one i had trouble with supply? I had to supplement formula with my first (and she did turn out fine — but there went the convenience! Now i was still nursing AND washing the SNS or bottles!) but by me being the pacifier in the beginning with my 2nd, i never had trouble with supply. He got exactly what he wanted each feeding. Expect to be latched on LOTS in the beginning and that should help with supply! (Drink lots of water while she’s eating!) I wasn’t a “runner” back then though i did run and worked out and everything worked fine — but i HAD to nurse or pump first thing in the morning before i could work out! Or ouch! Like everyone is saying, do what’s best for you, but one more comment — i’ve heard food allergies can be a concern with formula use and my 2nd kid who hardly ever had formula did have food allergies (eggs, peas, peanuts) and eczema, but he has outgrown them. My friend breastfed 2 weeks and her daughter has more severe (and not outgrown) allergies and eczema and i’ve always wondered, could it have been more mild if she’d kept breastfeeding? Would I have been smarter if my mom had breast fed me?? Hmmm…But seriously, i turned out fine with the ol’ formula so don’t feel guilty if it doesn’t work out… We will be your cheerleaders out here in blogland though – you can do it!

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I commented before reading all the other comments but totally agree with the book recommendation!

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baby #1 no interest in breastfeeding, baby #2 curious but it hurt and seemed awkward so shortly after a few attempts to the bottle I went, baby #3 I want to breastfeed! It’s free!! And It’s so organic, I want!.. but it did not work out.. I tried for months.. I cried several times.. bottles were just the way it went for me..

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I do not have first hand experience…but I plan on pumping when I do have children.

I’ve had friends that have breast fed. One of them did it for two weeks, had trouble latching, and ended up pumping. That worked fine for her and baby Emma.

Another friend did the breast feeding. It was rough for about 6 months. She would email me about how her nipple looked like it went through a grinder and she wasn’t sure if her baby was getting more blood or milk. Yeah, traumatizing.

Anyway, good luck!

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You are such a cute mama! I breast fed my kids. Lactation consultants are awesome! The nurses will also be a great help. I would definitely try pumping a few times at the hospital so that the lactation consultant can answer any questions.
Boppy pillows are wonderful as well. I know it’s one more thing to bring to the hospital, but it’s amazing! Breast feeding can be difficult, but once you get the groove it’s super easy. I felt like I needed three hands the first few days. I loved that I could do something for my kids others couldn’t. It was our special time together that I could spend with my kids.
La Leche League is a great resource on breastfeeding. Our hospital also offer breastfeeding classes.
The biggest thing is to relax and try to keep calm. Babies can feel tension, and then they will get upset. If you are calm (or at least faking it), then they will stay relaxed and eat. I know it’s easier said than done. I can’t tell you the number of times I have had a friend not be able to pump or get the baby to nurse, and then when I’m there, it works out. Not because I know all about breastfeeding, but because the mom relaxed knowing they had someone there who had been there before.

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I’m not a mother nor am I nearing motherhood but its been talked about with The Husband. I figure I can learn how to deal with puking babies and breastfeeding – I’m completely and utterly terrified of what happens when they become defiant teenagers that can make life altering decisions. If they choose to make bad choices its going to be all my fault and I don’t want that. Its freaky scary and its a huge reason I avoid the “when are you having kids” talk. Apparently I don’t like teenagers and I didn’t like myself as an awkward teenager.

But, I’ve been told that you have years to love them and raise them before they become annoying teenagers so chances are I’ll still like my own awkward teenager….I sure hope so!

{also, I should probably stop watching Teen Mom…}

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Breastfeeding can take work but it is worth the effort. Ask questions if you have them and utilize your resources! Your hospital should have lactation consultants available and your birthing nurses may even have some knowledge. La Leche League is a good place to research online. If your baby has some trouble latching or getting it at first, keep trying and you can pump to keep your body producing.

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It sucks (HA!) the first week or two, and then that pain is 500% worth it for the benefit of the following months – for both you and her. Make sure you don’t let her cheat and latch on incorrectly (learned that one the hard way). Lansinoh cream was a lifesaver. In the end, everyone is different, and if it doesn’t work for you, don’t beat yourself up. No 16 year old ever got mad at their Mom for not breastfeeding them, I can guarantee you that!

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Breast feeding is more emotionally hard than anything….is baby getting enough, but I’m SO tired, etc etc. I started doing a formula bottle in the night so daddy could help. If u don’t buy a medela pump, rent one. SO worth it. And you can cut two tiny holes in a sports bra so u can pump hands free. They sell bras for that but it’s way cheaper to use an old bra :). Another thing I didn’t know about is the night sweats for the first weekish. Just all the fluid from pregnancy coming out. I laid a towel down in bed and kept a couple dry towels and tshirts next to bed so when I’d wake up drenched. I’d just change it all out real quick. Being a mommy is so amazing & ur gonna be awesome at it!!

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I had a hard time with breastfeeding. My little one also had to go back to the hospital for jaundice. We also asked for the Lactation Consultant to come and “coach” us. We ended up supplementing until around 9 months when we switched to formula. Either way, do what’s best for you and the baby. Lots of people scolded me for supplementing. But it’s none of their business.

I know lots of people that stayed active and ran while breastfeeding.
Don’t worry. You’ll figure it out. Just read about it, relax and talk to the nurses.

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Dr. Sear has a lot of info on his site, as well.

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Use the resources available from Le Leche League, lactation consultants are free to talk to at the hospital but I also recommend hiring one to come to your house a day or two after you give birth, drink Mother’s Milk tea everyday to increase and encourage supply after birth, and try try try to take deep breaths and realize that your body is designed to do this. Stress and worry can make breastfeeding harder and not an enjoyable experience. I’ve been a doula for years and those have been the things that have worked best for my new Mommas :) You will figure out a way that works for you :)

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You are so sweet. I was terrified and I had good reason go be. Everything that could go wrong, did. But I went to a lactacion consultant a few times, ended up with a nipple shield and I nursed Pman for a year. I wasn’t to set on it in a hippie way but it drastically reduces your risk of breast cancer. I’m glad I gave it a fighting chance. It was the most UN natural thing I have ever done. But not everything has to be easy to be worth it, right? I would recommend having the consultant visit you everyday in the hospital and when you get home make another appointment if you need. Also, it took me two weeks to figure it out and I feel like a lot of people quit if it doesn’t happen right away. And finally, be kind to yourself. If it works great, if not, it doesn’t mean you love her any less. I’m so excited for you, being a mommy is entirely amazing!!!

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I’d like to second Kendra’s point about it really reducing your risk of breast cancer. My mom was diagnosed with it last fall (and beat it – YAY!). Because of this, I’ve been asking my doctors what preventative things I can do, too, and they all say that when I have a child, I should breast feed. I’ve heard it’s really hard and tiring, but I’d suggest giving it a chance! Good luck!

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Shanna, that’s so awesome!!! Congrats to you and your mom!!! Such a scary thing to go through. My grandma and my aunt are both B.C. survivors so I know its in my genes and I’ll do whatever I can to prevent that. I’m so happy for you and your mom!!!

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Here’s my advice:
Go to a breast feeding class before baby comes and bring your man with! One thing that surprised me was how important it was to have my husband on board with everything. In the first few weeks you will need his help to get positioning right and it helps of he can give you feedback on whether or not the latch is right, etc.
Find your local breast feeding support group. I went every week and it was like having a lactation consultant for free! (couldn’t afford having one come to me.) I also met one of my best mom friends there so that was an added bonus :)
Good luck!!

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My biggest advice is to surround yourself with people who can support and encourage you through it and who you feel comfortable with. I have two sisters-in-law who were amazingly helpful. One of them forced me to go to the doctor when I wasn’t feeling quite right and it turns out I had mastitis. If it wasn’t for her I would have gotten much more ill.
I was lucky and both of my daughters were nursing champs and I nursed them each for about two years. I’m not going to lie though, it really hurt the first two weeks but I found it helpful to distract myself with blog reading or watching a movie.
Also, if you can, buy a good breast pump like a Medela. It will be a lifesaver if you can pump a bottle for Billy to feed her because sometimes you just need a break from being the milk truck around the clock. Breastfeed is awesome and totally worth it but don’t beat yourself up if you decide it’s not for you.

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I think you’ll do just find with breast feeding. I think you have to have a really strong, ‘can do’ personality to breastfeed because at times, to be honest, it sucks, literally haha From reading, it seems like if you want something you will work hard to get it and not give up. That attitude applies to breastfeeding. It hurts for awhile, my son wouldn’t latch for the first 2 months so I used a breast shield and then slowly weened him off it. I think if you tell yourself ‘I will breastfeed no matter what’ than you will. I found the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh the difficulties. I felt like my stomach went back to normal quicker(while you breastfeed your stomach continues to contract), I lost my weight faster, and I could eat a lot more (nursing+ running=lots more food=)) It was cheaper(free!) and the health benefits to the baby are amazing, and I loved that one on one time with my baby. On the other hand, if you are unable, no worries, formula has come a long ways and is great too! k enough of my ranting…

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P.s. if you do nurse get a hooder hider so you can nurse on the go. Once I mastered that I was so much happier. I hated the thought of being trapped at home just so I could feed him. And I’m not “mom enough” to not cover up, but that’s just me.

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You are so stinkin’ cute! Everyone has pretty much said everything I was going to suggest. But I’ll say a few things anyway :)

I was SO TERRIFIED to breastfeed- only because I reaaaaally wanted to do it, and was so scared it wouldn’t work out for me. Both of my babies had a very weird latch and so, for the first few weeks, it DID hurt. A lot. Anyone who tells you “breastfeeding shouldn’t hurt” is silly. If you read through any forums, you’ll see the majority of women say that bf’ing does hurt for the first few weeks while your nipples “toughen up.”

Both of my children also lost almost a whole pound before they started gaining weight back- so don’t let anyone bully you into supplementing formula if you don’t want to. They’ll get back up there!!

Lastly, I’m still a running/nursing momma and I have to say this- I am hungry ALL THE TIME. Like, ravenous. I bet you can’t wait :) Just make sure to drink LOTS of water. Good luck, you can do it!!!!!

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This is a good resource for evidence-based tips & advice on breastfeeding, supply, managing plugged ducts, etc.! http://kellymom.com/ The hospital lactation consultants were helpful too.

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Love Kelly Mom!

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My only advice with breastfeeding is to stick it out! The first few weeks are not a gauge of the rest of the breastfeeding relationship. Give it a good 6-8 weeks and after that it’s usually gravy…. gravy to the point where it’s so much easier than bottles.

Think of it as a marathon. At about 2-4 weeks you might “hit the wall,” but keep your eye on the finish and it will be worth it.

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Oh, and I did nurse while training for a marathon and ran one when my son was only 13 months old. You will be able to eat a boatload of food, lol. Just don’t try to nurse with sweaty salty boobs either. That was a no go. I would have to rinse off before nursing. My kid was pretty intuitive that I was just really disgusting, and not having any of that!

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Breastfeeding did NOT come naturally for me. I tried for 2 months and my son never latched. I went back to work after 6 weeks and I was resenting my son. My husband and I decided that it would be best if I stopped breast feeding and switched to formula. I took a lot of grief over this from family members who believed that breast is best.
I have a really large chest and thought that that would make breast feeding easier…turns out, it makes it harder. I never got any mastitis and was a little creeped out by the whole process (honestly). My son has been incredibly healthy and is now two and a half and thriving. We are due with our second 2 weeks after you and I will give breast feeding another shot. If it doesn’t go well, I’m not going to beat myself up over it this time.

You will do great and it is important to make the best decision for you and your family!!

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I have been reading your blog for a while and never commented before but I feel this is the perfect post to start! I just had my baby boy a week and a half ago (my first!) and breastfeeding has been tough for me. My best advice is to not give up and find a clinic with lactation consultants you can see for any troubles you are having. My husband and I have gone in several times for help and their advice has been invaluable! We are still working through some issues but hoping to see the light at the end of the tunnel soon. I was told that the biggest factor in successfully breastfeeding is motivation and I believe that to be true. If you have the motivation to breastfeed and will do anything to make sure you are successful then you will be. Congratulations on your little girl – motherhood is the best adventure!

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My best friend had her first child a little over a year ago. She was so frightened about breastfeeding that she almost didn’t give it a shot. We talked a lot the time about how much it petrified her. Well, it turned out to be her most favorite thing. She was s sad when her milk supply dwindled because she loved it SO much. She said she felt so connected to her son and that it was the best bonding experience. She also swore by nipple guards. She said they helped a ton.

On the flipside, both of my sisters chose not to breastfeed. The choice is yours and don’t feel guilty about whatever you decide. :)

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Ask for help early and often. Then ask for more help. ;) I think my husband was more frustrated than I was in the early days. He so badly wanted to help me and our little girl! Be patient and keep an open mind. Breastfeeding didn’t work out perfectly for me, but thanks to a good breastpump my girl received all the benefits of a breastmilk-only diet for six months. My grandma reared 10 kids on formula, so I was ready if bf-ing hadn’t worked at all. Everyone is different, and I will send good vibes your way as you figure out what is right for your family. Keep smiling – happy pregnant mommies make happy babies!

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What a great supply of answers! I BF both of my boys… but I didn’t last as long for my 2nd (only 2+ weeks).

My advice is similar to so many of those above:

SUPPORT is critical. I mean support of whatever decisions you make and however it is going!

EDUCATE yourself. Lactation consultants are great (don’t be shy about asking anything and showing everything to them so you can get all the help you need).

LANSINOH cream. Maaaan BF hurts at first, but it gets better!

RELAX! It was so much easier for me to breastfeed when I was relaxed about it and not worried and stressed (easier said than done… but it’s true).

Have CONFIDENCE. You are going to be a GREAT mother and you are going to have to make a million choices that are right for you, your daughter and your family that not everyone else around you would make. It’s ok to be yourself. Only YOU can be the perfect mom for your little girl!

Good luck! :)

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I think the unknown of breastfeeding is what was so hard for me when I was pregnant. But fortunately all went smoothly for me (even with ups and downs of pain, clogged milk ducts, etc.). Sounds silly, but besides loving the closeness with my babies all the benefits for both mom and baby, I loved the convenience of it. When we were going anywhere, it was enough to remember the diaper bag, change of clothes, etc., one thing we didn’t have to worry about was formula and bottles!

With my first baby I trained for and ran a half marathon when she was 9 months old (I breastfed her until she was 13 months). I would feed her right before a long run, strap her in the jogging stroller (once she was old enough) go run a few hours, take her out and feed her again. Fortunately for me, I never had any suppy issues throughout my running. I’m betting you will do great!

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Lots of liquids!!!!! I drank a ton of water. Also, you will definitely doubling up those sports bras. Nursing came very natural to me and my three kids. Biggest advice..DON’T OVERTHINK IT! Really, don’t stress about it and relax.

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My mom gave me the best advice when my first daughter had problems latching on for the first 3 days. She reminded me that the baby was brand new and is learning, too. The more relaxed you are, the easier it will be to figure out. The baby can tell if you are stressed.

But, it DOES hurt for the first 2 weeks until your nipples toughen up. (sorry if TMI)

Also, feeding your baby bottles does NOT make you a failure no matter what anyone else thinks. You make the choices for your own little family about what you think is best and everyone else can grow up and accept it.

You’ll do great!!! We’ve all been new at this at one point, so you’ll have LOTS of empathy!

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Loved, loved, loved breastfeeding….I was kind of sad when my daughter just stopped suddenly at 11 months. I thought I was going to have to wean her but she cut me off cold turkey. That being said, I did NOT love it for about 2-3 weeks at the beginning. It was well worth it and I’m glad I stuck it out, but I do see why people give it up before that 2-3 week time period was up! You CAN do it, but it is up to you and what works for you and your baby. Don’t let anyone guilt you into breastfeeding. Perfectly healthy, happy babies are results from formula as well!

Look at The Leaky B@@b on Facebook for lots of info and testimonials, questions, etc.

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I wrote my comment before reading the others but I totally agree about the early weeks!

It took me about a month to get a good groove with breastfeeding. It was tough but I love it now. My favorite part of the day are those quiet moments with just me and my son- awesome bonding experience!

Set small goals for yourself. I initially wanted to breastfeed for a year but after the first 2 weeks, I gave myself a month. Then 6 weeks. Then 2 months. Then 3 months. Then 6 months seemed totally do-able!

And here we are now- he makes 6 months today and we’re still breast feeding =)

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First off I have to say I’m a new follower and you are just TOO adorable; I am loving your blog!

With my first bfing was second nature; I had NO trouble whatsoever. My second was just born in November and I struggled with her at first but we eventually got the hang of it. When I started running in January I did not notice any change in my milk supply – just make sure you eat an additional 300-500 calories and get your vitamins and calcium and your body will do the rest :)

Good luck!

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I don’t have any kids yet, so I can’t offer any advice, but I will be the one who constantly remarks how so darn cute you are in all your belly shots! :)

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I’m sorry I can’t give any advice about breastfeeding (not a mommy yet!) but I just wanted to say that you look beautiful! We’re all so excited for you!

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This is definitely my biggest fear as well. And for me, it’s not only the not knowing how to do it, and all the learning/pain, etc. that will have to happen, but also it kinda weirds me out. I’ve been around it my whole life and all my sisters have done it, and it doesn’t weird me out when others do it or anything…it’s just getting used to the idea of doing it myself. Everyone says that it’s so natural and such an awesome bonding experience, and I hope that happens. But since I’ve never done it before, it just seems kinda strange and UN natural, if that makes sense.

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Did breastfeeding come natural to you?

Natural? YES. Easy? NO. I read books and looked at videos on YouTube and knew that most pain women felt was fixable by adjusting the baby’s latch and/or position. Minutes after birth I was able to have skin to skin contact and breastfeed my son. He latched on like a pro! But once we were home we still struggled with proper latch and it was painful. We learned and eventually got the hang of it.

What advice do you have for me?

Get in touch with a lactation consultant in your area now. Find out if the hospital has one on staff and confirm that they will visit with you during your stay. Before you leave the hospital, make an appointment with a lactation consultant because sometimes they may not have any openings for a week!

Don’t accept a bad latch. If it hurts at all, gently unlatch your baby with your pinky and try again. Most pain is caused because the baby has a shallow latch. A correct latch is painless.

Try to form a “sandwich” with your breast so that it fits better in baby’s mouth. Cup your hand like a “U” shape and squeeze so that it’s slightly flattened and fits better for baby. I had to hold my breast like this for a while before my baby’s latch developed.

It’s called breast feeding, not nipple feeding.

Don’t give up!

Any good books/websites that you recommend I read?

“So That’s What They’re For”- Janet Tamaro
http://www.kellymom.com
Look for videos by Dr. Jack Newman.
http://islestyleliving.blogspot.com/p/breast-feeding-series.html

Did running/working out effect your supply?

Nope. I heard that it could affect the taste of your milk due to lactic acid buildup but debunked that myth on http://www.kellymom.com.

**It’s tough, but so worth it! Be as prepared as you can before you give birth. Don’t be afraid to seek help. I met with 3 different lactation consultants. All worth it! My son is 6 months today and is exclusively breastfed (no solids or formula, yet!).**

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It was not easy for me, but I sucked it up for my first baby. He was taking to it just fine, and getting more than enough…but it hurt like a mother!
It was very easy for my second baby…for me…but not for her. So I stopped at about 5 weeks and started formula.
I was making myself sick comparing myself to the moms who had said it was so easy and natural. I didn’t really “like” doing it. I was very uncomfortable doing it anywhere public, and I would hide out in the car or a private room or a bathroom stall. It wasn’t “fun” and “glorious” but it was something I knew was “best”.
My daughter who was formula fed for the most part turned out just as perfect as my son who I nursed for almost a year.
So, long story short, and probably what everyone else will tell you – except for the lactation lady at the hospital – do what works for you and your baby! :-) You’ll figure it out, even if you feel like you have no idea what the HE*& you’re doing, trust your gut, girl!

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hey! I listened to the “Pregtastic” podcast on itunes and they have a couple really good posts on breastfeeding you should check out. The podcast is no longer running but you can get all the old episodes and they are SO good. I have never done it myself but I am pretty determined to make it work. I think it will be a learning curve for both me and the baby but its like running right? It make be hard and a little frustrating/painful but if you keep at it the rewards all come through. I hope so!! I know you will do great!

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I’m in the middle of figuring out breastfeeding and one thing that has been super helpful has actually been writing about my experience on the blog. SO many friends and family members have called, messaged, or commented to give suggestions and help. So don’t be embarrassed about sharing because pretty much everyone who has breastfed understands. One thing that has kept me going for the last month is going to a breastfeeding bunch where a lactation consultant comes and mom’s can ask questions and feed their babies while she watches. See if your hospital offers that. Also stay in touch with your lactation consultant and keep bothering them till you get everything figured out. Don’t be like me and let it hurt for a whole month :( Now they have us going to physical therapy (for the baby) to help loosen up her tongue and spine because that can cause pain while breastfeeding (common if you have a long labor I guess). And we are going to be trying the chiropracter this week. Everybody is different but there is always somebody who has gone through what you are going through so you’ll make it :)

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I’m actually due on Aug 24th too! But this is my 4th baby :) I wasn’t scared about breastfeeding, but I think that was because I’m too cheap to pay for formula for a year and I just assumed it would work out because it had to. I did have issues with my first kid not wanting to nurse for about the first 12 hours of his life. He just wanted to sleep and the nurses really pressured me into giving him formula. In hindsight, he was probably so sleepy cause I had to have two rounds of the epidural meds.

My third one was a voracious eater and she was non-stop nursing at the hospital. It seemed like torture cause I wasn’t able to sleep, but it turned out well because my milk came in before I even left and I never got engorged! So, what I’m trying to say is, feed them whenever they are willing. No more and no less. They are pretty smart creatures.

Don’t worry too much about mastitis. You’re one up on me for knowing about it so early on. I only got it with #3 and I hadn’t ever heard of it so I thought I had the flu. And I have a friend with 6 kids and she never did get it!

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Oh and get a good breast pump (mine is an electric Ameda brand one). I used it in the first couple weeks to help relieve the engorgement and stored up milk to use in bottles when traveling.

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I just had my first child on June 1st, breast feeding was difficult because of latching on issues. The nurses were great and showed me tricks and techniques to try. The turning point was when they gave me a nipple shield to use, a life saver!! It’s kind of neat because you can see what you’re producing too.. Too much information? I also use a pump here and there for production increase and relief of pressure on my breasts….

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Well I am not a mom, but if it makes you feel any better my mom did not breastfeed me or my younger brother because it did not “agree with” me and it made her miserable, and then when my brother was born she didn’t even want to mess with it anymore. And so far so good, I am 22 and very strong with no known allergies or asthma or anything like that. I got the “early breast milk,” but my brother didn’t and he turned out fine too! P.S. Actually formula didn’t agree with me very well either, so the doctor told my mom to feed me vanilla ice cream for nutrients. True story : )

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Each time I have delivered all three of my kids, the breastfeeding part is a bit overwhelming for me. With my first, I didn’t know enough and unfortunately, didn’t really have that much support from the hospital I delivered at. I was able to breastfeed Mason for 6 weeks, before I couldn’t do it anymore. I had mastitis on each breast and couldn’t push through the pain. I felt like a horrible mother, but then my wonderful Gram reminded me that Mason was still going to get the nourishment he needed and that as long as I felt better, it was worth it. I was happier mom and Mason could definitely tell. With Taylor, I really wanted to nurse her. Thankfully, I had great nurses at the hospital to help encourage me. It was still painful, but after a couple of weeks, we had it down and I was able to nurse her for the first year. With Peyton, it was still painful in the beginning and we finally had the hang of it, but she developped RSV and weined herself from nursing. I’m personally not a fan of pumping, so she went to formula at 3 months. The Le Leche site is very informative andt helpful. Do what is best for you and your little girl.

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Breastfeeding is so worth. Just relax and drink plenty of water. I had so much milk from my second child that I was able to donate a ton to the victims of Hurricane Katrina. Best of luck to you.

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Breastfeeding did not come naturally to me only because it was new! My one piece of advice is to throw your concerns out the window, don’t be afraid to ask for help, the nurses will see your boobs. Take advantage of the time you’re in the hospital to get all the questions you have answered. You’ll figure out what position works best for you and baby girl and you’ll get the hang of it! I was so afraid that “my boobs wouldn’t work” so it’s only natural that you’re a little scared. You’ll be great Janae, whatever works for you and baby will be the best thing…breastfeeding or not!

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As a first time mom 3 years ago I knew nothing about breast feeding. I had no idea what I was doing but after a few days we (me and my daughter) got the hang of it. Don’t worry so much about it, there are a ton of resources out there. I had a lactation consultant stop by while I was at the hospital, they even called a few days later to see if I had any questions. Do whatever you feel is best but don’t get discouraged if it takes a little bit of time. Good luck!!

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Im a new mom and breast feeding is such a great bonding experience. I was totally worried about it too …but the best advice is to try to get a hang of it while your at the hospital. Get help when you need it and you will need it. Also, know it gets easier and less painful as time goes on. Now six weeks later I love it. Also, get my breast friend. It’s a lifesaver especially at the beginning.

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I was on the fence about breastfeeding too. But, when I got to the hospital to give birth to my son, it was like a switch had been flipped and I was totally gung-ho about breast feeding. Try to find a lactation consultant right away. They usually have them at most hospitals. They are wonderful at teaching you proper latch techniques and ways to hold your baby during a feeding. The first 3 weeks were rough, but that might have just been because of sleep deprivation. Also buy the Lanolin ointment for your nipples (madela or Laniosh). It will prevent them from getting chapped and its fine for the baby.
In the beginning I was hoping to make it to six months, but I’m proud to say that I nursed my son for a little over a year. Good Luck Jane! I think you will do great! :)

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1. “So That’s what They’re For” by janet Tamayo

2. kellymom.com

3. cafemom breastfeeding forum for questions. The women there are super knowledgable and very pro breastfeeding.

4. lactation consultant. preferably Internationally Board Certified. or IBCLC

5. persistence. it is HARD! You will be challenged. But stick with it and it gets easier. Never quit on a bad day.

I know that you’ll do great. Your optimism is infectious!

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Heck no! breastfeeding didn’t come natural. You’d think it being a natural thing you should just be able to slap that baby on your boob and be good to go. The first few weeks with each of my children was difficult. My youngest just wanted to nurse 23 out of 24 hours and I was so sore I wanted to cry everytime I had to latch him on. But after you both get the hang of it, it’s sooo rewarding! It’s special bonding time between just you. And no getting up in the middle of the night and having to heat a bottle and mix formula and wash bottles. No packing up all that junk everytime you have to run out somewhere. You aren’t likely to forget your boobs at home, which is a plus with “new mommy brain.” My advice is stick it out. It gets easier. Before you know it’ll be old hat! Also find a lactation consultant! (Make sure they have breastfed before! No joke they sent me some girl who looked like she was barely out of high school and most certainly never had any babies…I couldn’t take her seriously) The two women who are my consultants are amazing and I honestly couldn’t have gotten thru the rough patch without them. My son is 2 yrs 2 months and still nursing…yep I’m mom enough!

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I, too, wanted to breastfeed my little Olivia (4 months old now) but she didn’t latch on well and I had low milk supply, which was very frustrating! I saw a lactation consultant in the hospital and had three visits afterwards and I basically became slave to my pump for 6 wees before I called it quits. Most people have a better experience than me, my lactation consultant said a lot was due to Olivia being breech. Who knows most important is to feed your baby and that she gains weight and is healthy and happy!

Congratulations!

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I breast fed all 5 of my kids (twins!). My singleton (my 1st 3 boys) I breast fed exclusively. They would not take a bottle. I didn’t try a bottle till it was too late. If you plan on supplementing, get her used to a bottle within the 1st few weeks. Hopefully you have a fabulous nurse that will help you and not discourage you. (Usually the good ones breast fed their own kids and know how to help). Don’t feel weird when this woman is grabbing your breast and shoving it into your baby girls face!! It does hurt when the milk comes in but you are tough and will be fine! I hope it works out for you. My kids are NEVER sick! I honestly think it has to do with it. I only breast fed the twins for 6 months and supplemented from day 1. I HATED pumping so refused to and would give a bottle as needed. My milk supply wasn’t as strong since I was skipping feedings for bottle feedings and was so busy with the other 3 that I would need help. (I had 5 kids ages 7 & under). Don’t feel bad if breast feeding doesn’t work for you. (I haven’t written BREAST so many times in my life). GOOD LUCK!!! I can’t wait to hear all about it.

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One more thing… you can read all the books you want but in the end, it will happen or it won’t and you can google questions!!

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Another thing you need is a Hooter Hider. The best cover-up for nursing.

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I breastfed my two sons for a year. My first was born 9 weeks early and I pumped most of the first few weeks. My tips:
*relax, relax, relax
*water, water, water, and then drink more water
*be patient with yourself
*take off your shirt or pjs – yes nurse naked and in private to start. No worries. You can master the whole discreet nursing thing after you get and HRG baby get the hang of it.
*it’s not easy, give yourself a break
*it is sooooo worth the time and effort – enjoy skin to skin time (even if you don’t nurse)
*USE the breastfeeding consultants at the hospital
*ask to meet them and get advice right away – they are masters.
*did I say RELAX? When you are tense, HRG baby will be tense.
*then drink more water.
:)

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Since I love Jillian Michaels,
I wanted to share this link with you! It’s really helpful!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDhu8OASy-0

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While I have never had a baby, my mom has been a lactation consultant my whole life and instead of Clifford books, I read about breastfeeding as a child. haha, kidding slighty. From what I have learned from my expert mother, it is hard because it can be exhausting, but it was designed by God to be the most perfect thing for your baby. it will work if you want it to. There are so many amazing things about how it was designed (just another amazing thing about pregnancy) even down to the way you hold a baby during breastfeeding so they are looking at your face. It also is designed to create such a special bond between you and your baby. A truly devine process that I know you are going to rock at! Good luck with the rest of your pregnancy and becoming a new mom! You are going to rock it : )

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Yes, this. All of this.

If it is important to you, you will find a way.

I breastfed my first for 15 months, and am entering month 14 with my second. It is the most amazing experience, even the difficult parts. Yes, you will have times when you just want to give up, but, like running, you CAN power through the mind games and the down points and finish/reach the goal.

Just try. You’ll be amazed at what you learn about yourself from the task of being the source of such nourishment for HRG baby. You’ll love yourself more, your bond with her will be that much stronger.

Someone else said to nurse naked, and I’ll echo that – skin to skin contact is so amazing for baby. Get as naked as you can (both you and HRG baby) in those first weeks, stay home and have privacy/support as needed. If you make establishing breastfeeding a priority with your new teammate you will have the most success. Nothing else is as important in those first weeks. Really. Nothing.

Much luck – it’s been so great to watch you grow and learn through your pregnancy. You’re going to be so great!

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I have 2 kiddos who have never had formula, bf for 16mo and 21mo, am a NICU RN and lactation certified. And despite all my experience helping other moms bf, I had a really hard time with my first. I followed the same advice I gave my patients (or patients’ moms) – give it 40 days. That seems to be the magical number. And schedule appts for a lactation consultant the day after you leave the hospital. The La Leche League website has great info to locate an IBCLC (intentional board certified lactation consultant- the gold standard in training and certification for lactation) in your area. With my first, I had mastitis (uncomfortable but not a big deal, really), but latching was my real problem, which surprised me bc I had helped hundreds + of mother-baby couplets initiate bf. but it looks different from a different angle, and felt different from a different perspective, and the new mom hormones made me lack judgement with getting a proper patch. But after time it worked out (though 5 years later I still have a scar to prove how difficult it was!) and I loved the experience of bf. I have lots of personal opinions and scientific facts to support bf, but ultimately it comes down to your choice. If you are determined to bf, it will happen for you. I was determined to bf exclusively for 12 mo and literally fought for it. Support is key. The womanly art of bf is a great book as well as the la Leche league website.

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Ok, the medical in me wants to correct my previous post. Mastitis can be a big deal and should be taken seriously. My individual case wasn’t bad and was easily treated. But I didn’t mean to imply that it is not a condition. Talk with your doc is you ever suspect mastitis!

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First of all, that is the cutest little belly ever. You are tiny! I too was nervous about breastfeeding and my 1st baby didn’t catch onto the whole thing very quickly. I had to have the nurses help which was SUPER embarrassing but she finally got the hang of it. My 2nd baby came out knowing exactly what to do. Sometimes I wonder if he knew or if I just wasn’t as scared…babies can smell fear ;) Like you said it will either work out or it won’t, don’t stress about it! You are going to be a great little mommy!

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YOU ARE THE CUTEST EVER!! Adorable picture!!

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I heard Babywise was a great book. :) Not a mom yet, so not sure. :)

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I am so so so glad I read this.. I just had my baby *gasp* 18 weeks ago. I can’t believe he’ll be 4 months old on Friday.

Anywho.. We had trouble breastfeeding at first but that’s because my little man wasn’t feeling too hot when he was first born (long story short, he just needed a little extra for a couple days and hten he was great). Also, I didn’t have a good breastpump at first. So..

Our second day home my mom brought me a nipple sheild because the nurses in the hospital introduced him to a bottle nipple without my OK! as opposed to finger feeding (if he won’t nurse at first, definitely try finger feeding before you turn to a bottle). Bottles really messed us up, but we’re on the mend now. In addition, the bad breast pump didn’t help my milk supply- it actually hurt it. My milk supply is much much much better now. I also drink mother’s milk tea and that also helps. Unfortunately, I have had to go back to work and didn’t get to just sit around and nurse my baby as tha twould have helped my milk supply as well.

Breastfeeding does NOT hurt unless they aren’t latching correctly or if you get mastasis (which is a RARE uccurence). Breastfeeding never hurt. The sensations are weird at first but you get used to it and fall in love with it. You have to sort of realize this special bond you get to have with your baby.
It took us about 6-8 weeks to really learn to work together and get this whole breastfeeding thing going. Zechary loves breastmilk and i think he enjoys spending time with his mama too. So, if it is hard at first DON’T GIVE UP! I promise it’ll be worth it. My lactation consultants were OK at the hospital, but luckily i knew another one that went to our church and lives in our neighborhood and i had her check us out. that helped.

Also, don’t forget to just relax. your baby needs you to relax- it helps to take a hot shower first and then nurse. you’re relaxed, clean and happy.

I just read from Chelsea@RunningISMyDiet about Babywise and we also did this with our little man and it’s amazing! he is well fed, happy, content and sleeping through the night. i strongly suggest it. it talks about breastfeeding and everything in between. I stronggly suggest to NOT read the what to expect series. They can really put a downer on parenthood and having babies and i hated reading them. so save yourself and don’t read them!

BTW- the whole concept of babywise is getting your baby to take a full feeding at each feeding so that way they’re not just snacking all the time and never getting the good fatty hind milk. once again, the book explains that.

Sorry this was so long but i’m really passionate about breastfeeding and babywise!

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I just had my second little bugger 6 days ago. I ran till the end…3 miles the day before he made an appearance in this world and I have to say it made all the difference during my pregnancy. When I ran I felt good and at the end that’s a hard thing to come by. The birth went so fast and smooth because my body still new how to work hard. I just came across your blog after reading your guest post on fitnessista and I am so glad I did! I got a lot of dirty looks and a lot of negative feedback when people saw me and my big belly running but I am glad to read about someone else doing it!
I realized that your baby feeds off your emotion so much especially when it comes to breastfeeding..if you get frustrated so will she. Ive learned to relax and listen to everyone’s advice but then forming what works best for me and my little man. Im looking forward to adding you to my bookmarks bar and following your pregnancy/baby days running and eating!

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6 days ago! That is so exciting! Congrats! So good to hear that you ran throughout your pregnancy and that it made labor so much easier! Thank you so much for your comment, I really appreciate it!

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it did not come naturally for me at all. everyone told me about how it was a beautiful experience and blah blah, but i had a hard time seeing that. at least at first. also, everyone told me it would hurt like crazy, but nobody told me about the emotional roller coaster it would be. i am probably scaring you off! i’m not trying to. i did it because i felt like i should and because i knew it was best for my baby. i think i was too selfish? i went back to work and had to pump on my lunch break and then i lost my milk when he was like wish months. i felt SO GUILTY for switching to formula. my neighbor and i used to joke about breastfeeding bullies because there are some women who are so pro about it that they make you feel awful if you do it any other way.

ANYWAY, my point is that yeah it is hard and blah blah whatever, but it will work out. my advice would be DON’T STRESS! i put so much pressure on myself to do it and stick it out and do it right, and it made me paranoid that he wasn’t getting enough, wasn’t gaining weight, i wasn’t doing it exactly every 3 hours on the dot…i think i would have enjoyed it more if i hadn’t made it such a job for myself. i wish i could have relaxed and enjoyed it. that is easier said than done, but seriously. don’t stress. and if you DO switch to formula or supplement with formula? SO WHAT! it is perfectly healthy and dane is just as happy and normal as any other crazy 2.5 year old.

okay. longest comment EVER! and i probably scared you and didn’t help at all. so the end.

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I think my daughter came out of the womb breastfeeding, LOL! I took the class and read the books and felt confident that it was going to be okay and we could do it, so I didn’t have much trouble breastfeeding. It never hurt, except for every once and a while when there wasn’t a good latch or the boobies were FULL! I think the best advice is don’t get fustrated!! Once you get upset then you don’t think clearly and see what’s going wrong. Seek out the experts, there’s lots of support groups who show you the proper technique, highly reccomend this! I thought you just put the baby up there, but there is a proper placement, LOL! It is definitely time consuming, LOL! But the reward it worth it! Good luck!

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I only recently found out I’m pregnant (and I’m not that far along), but I’m learning that there is so much that I don’t know and I’m scared. Just read this blog post – http://www.pregnantchicken.com/pregnant-chicken-blog/2010/9/23/happily-after-giving-birth-10-things-they-dont-tell-you.html (eek!).

I might be coming to you for advice!

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Hey Janae, I’m 13 weeks pregnant and I’m still running so far – BUT, I’m finding it hard to know how hard to push myself, or not push myself. How are you gauging that? And do you have any tips?. Love your blog!

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Hey Michelle!!! Congrats wahoo and way to keep running!!! My doctor says that if I can talk pretty comfortably while running then I am totally okay! If I feel exhausted then I stop! For a little while I wore a heart rate monitor to help gauge myself too! I hope this helps, let me know if you have any other questions!

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Breastfeeding is one of the most important decisions you can make for your baby’s health. It can be nervous to think about doing the first time. If you want to breastfeed, you can!! It will take some planning/work/education at first and I would advise to get a lactation consultant outside of the hospital before you have the baby. It is not supposed to hurt if the baby is latched on correctly :) I am confident you can do it! Don’t be afraid, it is a wonderful thing for both you and the baby. Although formula provides the basic nutrition, breastfeeding has a long list of benefits compared to formula. Good luck :)

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OMG, there are already so many comments! I just wanted to say that it is good you are being realistic about it. It is hard and it doesn’t work for everyone and that is OK. Be patient and don’t be afraid to ask for help. And don’t listen to all of the “shoulds.” I think there is a terrible amount of pressure to breastfeed and it makes women feel like failures if it doesn’t work out. Yes, breastfeeding is amazing and so good for your baby, BUT it is only one piece of tho whole picture of caring for your baby. So, relax – it helps with your milk supply! LOL. Seriously, I breastfed for 11 months. I never had pain or mastitis. It was stressful at the beginning because my daughter was a premie and couldn’t latch on, but the lactation consultant suggested a breast shield and it helped immensely. I didn’t run at all while I was nursing. I was too tired (nursing takes a lot out of you!) and I just didn’t want to deal with squeezing my boobs into a running bra and leaking.

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I am breastfeeding #4. Have had just about every breastfeeding-related ailment a person can have throughout.

I always tell people that I breastfeed because I’m lazy. No bottles to mix up or wash or warm up, just pop in the boob and you’re good to go. It’s always the perfect temperature and already “mixed” and ready.

My best breastfeeding tip is to co-sleep. We are the only species that gives birth and then puts our baby in a box. I have co-slept with all four of my children; you won’t roll over on top of the baby. If it makes you nervous, they make a little thing that goes in your bed to protect the baby, but really, there’s nothing like waking up next to a beautiful baby cuddled up next to you. On the extra plus side, night feedings mean you don’t even have to fully wake up. Baby is fussing, pop a boob in her mouth, go right back to sleep. It has worked every time for me for four very different babies.

I always recommend to new moms something called “Newman’s Nipple Ointment.” You need a prescription for it and you have to get it at a compounding pharmacy. Do not leave the hospital without that prescription. Have Billy fill it before you get home. That Lanisoh stuff is garbage compared to Newman’s. Put on a thin layer every single time you nurse and you will prevent cracked, bloody nipples. Seriously. I didn’t have it for my first two, and it made a WORLD of difference for the most recent two in terms of the initial pain – and it is sometimes toe-curling pain when a baby latches on in the first few weeks, especially if your nipples are sore – over Lanisoh or Vitamin E or the other crap I tried. I’m going to have to disagree with the previous commenters who said it shouldn’t ever hurt. Serious pain, no, but every one of my kids hurt my nipples for the first few weeks. Some of them had perfect latches, and some, like my most recent, didn’t. (Most recent has a tongue tie. I opted not to clip it and she has turned into a champion nurser.)

God manages to make His creations work! He gave us breasts to feed our children. He didn’t invent formula, some company did. If you tell yourself that formula is not an option, you’re more likely to be successful at breastfeeding.

Kellymom.com is your friend…everything you ever need to know about breastfeeding is there.

I personally don’t have this big romantic connection to breastfeeding, I’m glad when we’re all done, but I believe that God entrusted this child to me, and it’s my job to do what’s best for that child. I know that what’s best is to breastfeed.

P.S. I’m training for a half marathon and nursing a very big 6 month old. She has yet to have a bite of real food. (Food before one is just for fun. Breastmilk is ALL your baby needs when she is a baby.) I wear 2-3 sports bras when I’m running. I’m doing a full in the spring and will likely still be nursing then. (I nurse until they are done, generally around age 2.) I have to drink lots more water between sweaty runs and breastfeeding, but that’s about the only drawback. I would go insane if I couldn’t get my sweat on; I know from reading your blog for so long that you are the same way!

P.P.S. As far as Babywise, I practice attachment parenting, so I’m of the opposite opinion and don’t EVER recommend that book. My kids have grown into independent humans, and I cherish the cuddling in bed, wearing them in a sling/baby carrier, etc. Do your research and decide for yourself.

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I just joined your blog a few months ago, once I started running (consistently) again (after a ridiculously long hiatus of 15+ years, starting again after I weaned my 2nd child), and love all your posts. It’s fun to hop over here to HRG Baby now and then too, of course. So I just thought I’d chime in on your breastfeeding fear. It’s ok to feel that way! There is a lot of uncertainty when you first start out. My best advice is to 1) decide whether or not you’re going to do it, and if so, then stick it out no matter what – the difficulties go away within the first month and you’ll be SO GLAD you persevered, 2) utilize all the help you can get – lactation nurses at the hospital, on-call lactation consultants over the phone, and let Billy do everything else (such as cooking and cleaning and diaper changes and burping) at first while you focus on feeding the baby, and 3) remember to drink a LOT of water and snack/eat well throughout the day – nursing causes you to need even more calories than pregnancy and you’ll find yourself famished, especially if baby girl eats a lot at night or cluster feeds. Just keep a positive attitude – you CAN do it :-)

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Hmmm… breastfeeding is hard. It didn’t come “natural” for me, plus my first had a hard time with it. However, I LOVED it. I loved being the only person that could care for my baby in a certain way, and the bonding is the best. You just don’t get that with a bottle. The best thing I heard was to give it at least 2 solid weeks of only breastfeeding. That way you have enough time to really learn what you should do! It was good advice because I definitely wanted to quit at first, but after a couple of weeks I got the hang of it and loved it. I would even say to give it a month before you decide if you like it or not. The good news is that I heard that girls are better nursers than boys are, and it was totally true for me! I hope it’s true for you. I didn’t start exercising until my daughter was 7 months old (and I didn’t exercise at all before that), and it didn’t really affect my milk. Just make sure you eat and drink a lot!

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My third baby was just born two months ago. And even though I consider all of my babies to be excellent nursers, it has still been challenging each time. I would definitely recommend asking for lots of help in the hospital. It takes practice to find the right position, hold, timing, latch, etc. for you and the baby. But it does work out and it does get easier–and it’s worth it. Read all you can about it NOW, because you’ll be so emotionally and physically drained by the time she comes that it’ll be twice as hard to get through any helpful material by then. Also, I am a BIG believer in routine, and I would totally recommend reading Baby Wise before she’s born. Some people don’t agree with routines, but I really believe it’s the best thing for you and the baby (especially if you want to get back to working out ASAP). And the book helps you get into a routine quickly–which helps with nursing and sleeping. My baby (who is a major chunk already) has been sleeping through the night now for a month. Seriously, 10 hours straight every night since he was a month old. And I credit it all to Baby Wise. Total lifesaver! Good luck!!

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Janae,
I love how positive and encouraging your posts always are…even when you’re not feeling 100%. :)

I am breastfeeding my 2 month old baby girl right now and am going through a kind of frustrating period. With both of my kiddos (who are solely breastfed) I’ve noticed that on the days when I run/workout, my supply is definitely lower. Actually it’s a 1-2 days after I run that I notice my supply lowers. But then it comes back after a couple days of rest. So what I do is run on the weekends and then again on Wednesday. That way I give myself a couple recovery days in a row in the beginning of the week and the end of the week to allow my supply to build back up. Also I drink a TON of water and eat way more calories on the days I run/workout. One more thing, if you’re up for trying herbal supplements, Fenugreek is something I’m taking that increases your milk supply. You take 2 pills three times a day and only until you notice the supply is back to normal. Sorry for slamming you with so much info but I love talking about this topic! I think it’s totally do-able to breastfeed exclusively and run at a fast pace as long as you know what to do. You’ll be a natural mom so I’m not worried about you. :)

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