Since we last caught up and my story of stress fractures!

I am SO SO SO glad that Andrew and I got to go out and ski together this week.  I had completely forgotten how much I love to ski.  It was so good to be out there and reminded of my love for it.  I started skiing when I was 6 and it was something I did with my brothers and dad.  Then once I was in high school I would go with my friends a bunch.  Once I got pregnant with Brooke I didn’t go again until Tuesday.  Andrew just switched over from snowboarding to skiing and luckily for me that means we are at the same level on skis ha (he normally is way better than me at this kind of stuff) so we wanted to do the same runs and race each other:)

It was a beautiful day at Sundance.  This ski resort is about a 15 minute drive from my parent’s house so it is crazy easy to get there.

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The sun kept us nice and warm and my quads working like crazy to keep me from flying too fast down the mountain kept me warm too.

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All of these pictures are from Andrew’s Go-Pro!

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I think for the first half of the day I was a little too fearless and going too fast and I took a bad fall:)  But after that I was a little more cautious about it and slowed it down a bit.  Andrew only fell one time too so we were happy to leave the mountain without any broken bones.

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One of my favorite parts about skiing at Sundance are their sandwiches.  This thing was a beast but perfect because skiing produces quite the hunger in me.  + salt and vinegar chips.

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+ this s’mores bar that we split.

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And then we were back out doing our thing for a bit before leaving.  Both of our legs felt like jello by the end.

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We went back to my parent’s house afterwards to find my mom trying to knock down the huge icicles at their house!

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Back together again.

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While Andrew worked on some things at my parents’ house, Brooke and I made our favorite chocolate chip cookies for some of our neighbors.

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Let’s talk about running now shall we?  So the air quality where I live is at an unhealthy level… it’s bad here.  Once we get another storm the air should clear up a bit but I’ve taken it to the treadmill every day so far this week to save my lungs.  It’s a good thing I had a lot of shows to catch up on and reading to do this week;)  Josse is in Hawaii right now (we swapped places).  I’m excited for her to get back and for the air to clear up and get in a good run with her again!

One day 5 miles @ 8:45 pace and the other day 9 miles @ 8:15 pace.  One speed workout to do before the end of the week and I have no idea when I will do it.

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Knox is home again and we are all pretty happy about it.  The kids don’t believe that Beretta is now older than them (she turned 5 on Tuesday) because they are taller than her… so we had to prove to them that Beretta is in fact taller than they are.

Andrew is on a pants streak… the last three days he has worn jeans (and shorts only one of those nights when we went to my parent’s house).  I think winter has finally got to him a bit;)

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A picture from Beretta’s bday… Brooke couldn’t wait to give her a bone.

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To answer the would you rather question about crunchy or soggy cereal… I am one of those weird few that prefer soggy cereal.  I know.  I don’t know how to change though so I just let it sit in my bowl for a few minutes before eating it.  Also, I don’t know if I have ever just had one bowl of cereal (unless I am about to go on a run and don’t want to be stuffed)… 2 bowls is my jam.

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Happy to see this scene again.  I am pretty sure they forget I exist though when they are together but that is for the best.  Although, they magically remember me again if they are having a disagreement or they are hungry.

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I thought this box from Costco was a perfect photo opportunity with them.

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Some nights we eat spiral zucchini/squash for our pasta and some nights we eat the good ol’ normal noodles.  Team spaghetti/lasagna over here for life.

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Since I posted about my stress fracture problem that I had on Tuesday I have received a bunch of emails asking for more info about stress fractures/what happened etc so I thought I would explain it all in one place!

Rewind to 2011…  I was training for the Boston Marathon and determined to get a sub 3 marathon (I ran a 3:04 marathon a few months previously).  I was underweight and did not fuel or refuel properly.  Each workout that I did was either HARD or medium hard.  I didn’t really understand that our recovery is just as important as our training.  Along with running pretty much every day, I was also teaching cycling classes a few times a week and burning way more calories than I was eating.  I remember my right leg starting to hurt really bad one day on a run.  It kept getting worse (I also didn’t understand the idea of STOPPING when there is pain) to the point it hurt to just stand on one leg at a time.  I eventually went in to see a dr. who took an x-ray of the area and told me that it wasn’t a stress fracture (stress fractures don’t really show up on an x-ray until it has started to heal when they can see the calcification on the bone) so I went to physical therapy for a few weeks.  PT was not helping so I went back to my sports doctor for another x-ray and sure enough I had a stress fracture in BOTH femurs (one was much smaller than the other).  I think I cried for 2 days straight, I was so sad to be missing out on Boston.  My siblings had paid for my plane tickets to get to Boston, I had bought my bib and I felt like sub 3 was GOING to happen there… I was really bummed/frustrated/angry/sad/every emotion ever.  I had a bone scan done and it said I had osteopenia (which I was able to reverse and get my bones back to a normal level later on).

Now I don’t remember all of the details but I am pretty sure it took about 4 months to heal before I could return to running again.  Returning to running involved running 1 mile every other day and then slowly building up from there.  My legs didn’t feel pain when I started to run again but I did feel a dull ache in them, which my doctor warned me about.  Patience is your best friend when returning to running after a stress fracture.  It is worth the wait.  During my time away from running I stuck to the pool (I swam a lot and my dr. said that was okay as long as it didn’t hurt, which it didn’t).  I did upper body strength workout, I took some time off from teaching cycling and started doing yoga after a while of healing.

After my femoral stress fractures I had another stress fracture or two in other areas but I have a few reasons why I think (no research behind this.. just my own thoughts but I assume they are right) I personally don’t get stress fractures anymore (knock on wood)…

*EASY DAYS.  I don’t go hard every day (or even close to every day).  I do way more easy miles than hard miles.  I probably do 2 days hard and the rest easyish.  Even when I was training for faster times last year with a coach and hitting my PR in the 1/2 marathon, I was running a lot of EASY miles.  Our body needs those to preform their best.

*If something is bothering me while I am running, I take time off.  I don’t try to run through it.  There is not a race out there that makes it worth it to risk my health.  I’d rather take a few days off or even a few weeks than a few months off or more.

*I started taking rest days seriously… instead of taking my rest days from running as a day to go crazy in some other way of exercise, I truly rest.

*I gained weight.  Increasing my body fat percentage and gaining some lbs helped me to build my bones to be stronger and healthier.  While I was underweight that brought about a loss of bone mineral density from my low estrogen levels which made my bones more brittle.  I was able to bring back my cycle by upping my body fat. I ate a lot more dietary fat, proteins, whole grains and ate more calories than I was burning.  It was quite hard on me mentally to do this but I hit rock bottom at this point and realized I could no longer live this way and I NEEDED to get the one body that I have, healthy.

*I stick to my happy place mileage wise.  I know where my body is happy and I stick there.  Our bodies can all handle different amounts of stress and we need to stick to what is best for us personally… not what we see all of the other runners on social media doing.

The end:)  Let me know if you have any other questions!  This was my experience with stress fractures and I know they happen from all sorts of different ways but this is what happened to me!

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Ever had a stress fracture?  Where? How long did it take to recover?

How has your training changed over the years?  Have you ever done WAY too much for you?

When you are injured and can’t run… what type of workouts do you do?

What is your workout today?

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55 comments

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All your points on stress fractures are really interesting! I don’t think I’ve ever had one but I’ve had shin splints before. I’ve got a weird pain in my legs at the moment, excuse me for not being very technical but if I rub my bone on the bottom half of my leg, it feels bruised – do you suffer with this at all or have any experience with what it could be?

I’ve reduced my gym sessions from 5 to 2 / 3 a week, I was burning out so quickly so I’ve realised it’s better to do quality over quantity :)

I’ve got a 16 mile run today but I split it because of time so I did 10 miles this morning and I’ve got another 6 to do this evening :)

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I have the same thing. There a lot of tendons in that area and I’ve been dealing with tendonitis issues. I’ve had several x-rays over about 6 months and it never showed any stress fractures. My doc said that sometimes the pain from tendons in that area can be enough to make you wonder about fractures.

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Thank you :) That makes me feel a better about it :) I hope your issues get sorted out soon!

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Yes I have that same kind of pain! Diagnosed with shin splints and have had them for 6 months-ish. But yes it feels just like a really sore bruise when you rub up and down the tibia bone. I am always scared they will turn into stress fractures and I do not think I will truly ever know. I ice, stretch, strengthen, and use a TENS+EMS unit on them daily…oh and anti-inflammatories from the Dr.. Graston and Astym therpy helped also.

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Thank you Dawn – sorry to hear about your shin splints, that must suck :( I will definitely try putting ice on them and I’m already trying to strengthen them :)

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It’s amazing how those tough times can teach us so much. I’ve had a few stress fractures over the years, the worst one being in my pelvis/hip. It was awful. I was on crutches for WAY too long, and I had to miss the Chicago Marathon, which I had been training for for months. Like you, though, I finally realized that I needed to have easy days that were actually easy, and I needed to focus on the importance of my health. I haven’t had any injuries like that in about six years, and I’m hoping I never have to deal with that again. Running has taught me a lot about life, and patience is definitely one of them.

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i like soggy cereal too :) I haven’t had a stress fracture (knock on wood) but it’s something I keep in mind as a runner to ensure I do everything I can to hopefully prevent it from ever happening!

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I like crunchy cereal. :) I had multiple stress fractures in HS and it was directly related to too much running on concrete. My body just can’t handle that amount of mileage. Even though I’m in a runstreak right now, my mileage is still low compared to a lot of other people training for a marathon. I’m definitely ok with that!
You’re making me want to go skiing! I took my husband when we first started dating and he was a hot mess out there on the slopes. It was SO funny. He literally wrapped himself around a snow blower machine and tumbled off the ski lift. Great memories. :)

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Aww, the cuties in the cuties box! So funny.

When I first started running, I hurt my hip, mostly because I was adding mileage way too fast for the shape I was in (a sitting job, a two-three hour commute, etc). I did weights while I was healing, and that helped a lot. I should probably do that again, but like you, I hate strength training.

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Brooke has such gorgeous skin it looks like she’s wearing blush and everything! Lucky girl lol.

I definitely advocate for swimming when high impact exercises are off the table.

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My first stress fracture in a tibia came from running too fast. I was running all of my easy runs in the low 7s and my PRs were only 15-20 seconds faster. I was new to running and didn’t know much different. I couldn’t withstand that training and ended up in a boot on my 21st birthday.

I’ve broken a couple of bones. My last fracture was from rolling my ankle (even though I never felt it).

It’s funny, some injuries, I’m gunho about training through but some I just like the rest. As I get older, I think I prefer the rest and time away from the sport to be honest!

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Story of my life! Thanks for writing this- it will help a lot of people.
I never got to the point of a stress fracture, but I did get to the point of over-training syndrome. I was running fast (1:18ish half marathon fast) but I was so underweight, so stressed, and running easy runs in the 630s (aka I was super stressed out and every run was a fight). I put on a bit of weight to get my cycle back and after coming back from a few down weeks, I ran 18:08 for a 5k (while being INCREDIBLY out of running shape- digging out of over-training is tough business) which was within 20 seconds of the best 5k I ran (en route for an 8k) which was 17:52 (and I was is stellar shape then, but again super underweight and over-training myself). I figured if I can do that, there is no telling what I can do if I stay healthy, train smart, and keep an SANE perspective on running (aka…homegirl, it is just running).
Long story short, you are doing all the right stuff in your training (my bf is a coach, and he even says that) and it is inspiring me in my quest to show that being happy, healthy, and running your own race is the best/smartest way to running pretty dang fast and free ;)

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Hahah that’s so funny that Andrew had Barretta stand on two paws to show off her height :D :D

Knock on wood I have never had a stress fracture but I have been dealing with on again, off again calf issues and taking rest days and going easy definitely helps me to keep running. Although some days running faster makes them feel better. Maybe my form breaks down when I am going too easy…?!

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Kristina,

I agree with you on this one. My left leg has been hurting all week. It feels like shin splints. Last night I had some speed work and really ramped it up. Today I actually feel very little leg pain. I think you’re right that our form breaks down when we run slower. It’s something I’ll think about tonight on my last easy run before my 15K this Saturday

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I have to say it. Why aren’t you wearing a helmet when you ski?? So important.

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I didn’t use to ski with a helmet, but one year we were in Aspen and a woman near us was killed when someone else collided with her. Now I always wear a helmet!

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That’s exactly what I was thinking… especially after your dads recent head injury from falling on the ice.
With that out of the way- I’m hoping to make it out to ski Sundance! What are your favorite runs out there??

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Not to be a total downer but my friend’s daughter died while wearing a helmet. Not saying the helmet caused it certainly! But anything can happen and if someone doesn’t want to wear one, that is their choice. This blog isn’t called “safety examples”.

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I didn’t wear a helmet when I went skiing in Utah this winter, but these comments have changed my mind. I only ski once or twice a year and I’m going to wear a helmet from here on out. I actually felt awkward when I was skiing without one because practically everyone on the slopes had them on.

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Hey girls!! Thank you so much for your comments and concern! I honestly had never really thought about wearing a helmet while skiing… you see them on the guys out there doing the double black diamonds sometimes and I grew up in a family that we never wore them when skiing. BUT now you have brought up some EXCELLENT points. Andrew and I will be really researching this out. Thank you for bringing such an important subject up and I’m thankful for the blog because over the years you have all helped me out in a lot of ways!

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Joining this late (I always catch up on blogs on the weekend). I totally agree! I’ve been skiing since I was 4 (so 26 years). Growing up, NO ONE wore helmets, but now almost no one doesn’t wear a helmet. It’s incredibly important even if you’re not going crazy hard down black diamonds. Anyway, love your blog Janae, and I wouldn’t want anything to happen to you two (feels weird saying that because I don’t know you haha!).

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I ran cross country in college and the summer before my sophomore year I got a stress fracture in my right foot. I was literally a week and a half before we moved into the dorm for the school year so I took off some time before I got with the team and then I couldn’t run a mile. After a couple of visits to the doctor, an MRI showed I had a stress fracture meaning I was out for the season. I was put in a boot and was limited to upper body work and the elliptical. No matter how much of that I did, it wasn’t enough to keep me where I wanted to be in my fitness level. I didn’t run for 3 months and 5 days. Like you, once I started back running it took a lot of little runs before anything grand would happen. Fortunately by my senior year of running I was able to get my 19:42 5K PR!

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I had a tibial stress fracture in 2015 during marathon buildup….for two months I was told it was just tendonitis and did tons of physical therapy, so I ended up running 600 miles and my marathon on the fracture! Around mile 22 I was like, ok, something is going on here that is NOT tendonitis, and I insisted on an MRI later! First time I’ve ever walked in a race but I finished in 4:26 and then didn’t run again for 3 months while I was stuck in a boot! My doctor was so amazed that I was still able to run that much, but from my reading, it’s not uncommon, especially in distance runners…which I think is why nobody thought it was a fracture bc I was still able to run. For me it never really hurt horribly while I was running but the aching would keep me awake at night.

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I suffered a stress fracture while training for the CIM a couple of years ago. My situation has some similarities to yours: while training I contracted c diff and probably lost close to 10lbs in one week. That, combined with training and PR’ing a half marathon was just too much for my femur to bear. Mine was in the upper femur and I had to take over 3 full months off of running. Now I am religious about rest days, eating right and eating enough. Cross training will always be just as important as putting in the miles and if something feels off, I dont hesitate to scale back my activity. Lesson learned.

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Some interesting research about causes of stress fractures. Thought it might be relevant for some of you who have experienced them:

http://www.runnersworld.com/sweat-science/6-stress-fracture-warning-signs

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Wow, thank you Emily for sharing this article… I am going to post it in my next post! Thank you and I hope you are having a fabulous day!

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YES! On board with the soggy cereal. I like that nice in-between: not soggy to the point that its mush, but soft.

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I have flat feet and my feet and legs really take a beating from the increased impact they take from running. I’ve had three fractures on the same side in a year’s time, one after the other. It’s been such a roller coaster and so disappointing. I’ve learned that I can’t push myself as hard as I want and that race training and long distance running will just never be an option for me. Running is my happy place, so I’ve just learned to take better care of myself and have realistic expectations so that I can keep doing what I love.

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Thanks for sharing, Janae!
I’ve never had a stress fracture but I know a ton of runners who have, including my boyfriend!

My running has changed because I’m doing a lot more of it! For my first 3-4 marathons I was probably only running 25-30 miles a week and not seeing the results I wanted (shocking, since I was putting in very little work).

In the last few years I’ve upped my mileage quite a bit and this training cycle I’m going to try to get up to 60s for the first time and see how my body does. Obviously that means a VERY slow and steady increase, but I’m curious to test my limits. I’ve only ever peaked at 54 miles in training!

When I was injured from my bike accident I could barely do any exercising- even Pilates and yoga were out of the question (it was soft tissue damage in my foot and balancing on one leg was out of the question) so I got into bodypump for a while! I liked it a lot!

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Love that you shared all of this! I had a stress fracture 5-6 years ago when I was eating a vegetarian, low fat diet… my bone density was also very low and like you I started increasing proteins and quality fats, gained a few healthy pounds and reversed my bone density through diet and an amazing vitamin. I think every girl/woman needs to be aware of how easily this can happen- even or especially when you think you’re doing everything right and eating a very healthy diet!

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I had a stress fracture in my hip. It took about 3 months to heal and I was constantly uncomfortable. I did a lot of PT, strengthening exercises, and I was allowed to do some time on the elliptical eventually. Honestly I was too sore to do much since it was the hip area; swimming, standing yoga, and the elliptical all hurt in the beginning. By the time I was allowed to run I was kind of afraid to. I had just started running and did too much too soon. While I was in good cardio shape I didn’t do enough strength training nor did I rest enough.

When my foot was injured I did pool running, seated Tae Bo, chair yoga and seated HIIT. (YouTube has a lot of videos for this). When I am allowed to do other things I like the elliptical and spin. I do yoga, barre, and strength training normally. I also started Pilates after this last injury since I couldn’t do barre with a torn fascia.

Today is strength and Pilates. (about 30 min each).

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Wow your story of stress fracture really touched me. I’m glad you’re doing all the changes you need to do in your life to avoid them!!!!

My training today was 5 mile with 3 miles done in tempo pace.

My training has changed in a way that I’m more realistic now. Last year I was so focused on training for a half marathon and started to put way too many miles for me every week. Thank God my Dad is my voice of experience, he talked to me and convicted me to slow down.

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Looks like you two had an awesome day skiing and snowboarding. The weather looks nice and sunny too.

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Please, please, please put on a helmet! You guys have 2 beautiful little ones you need to see grow old. Don’t take a chance. Please put on a helmet!!

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I never wore a helmet skiing on the east coast, but in Utah and Colorado I do. They keep you safe and warm!

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My life is so crazy busy that I actually think that this is the first time I’ve sat down and intentionally thought about my mileage changes and how it has affected my body! I used to consistently log 80-90 (sometimes 100) miles per week. I never got any running injuries, so I figured my body could handle the high mileage (keep in mind I’m also 39 years old, so not exactly a Spring chicken). Well, a couple of times last year when I went to pick up our 2 year-old, I threw out my back. I’m talking like, T3 pain reliever back pain. It was awful. And although it wasn’t a running injury, I believe that it was my body’s way of telling me to ease up a bit. Since I backed off my mileage (I cap it at 50-60 miles per week now, since June 2016), I notice that my body doesn’t ache the way it used to when I’d get up from a sitting position. My feet bones don’t ache when I get out of bed in the morning. I thought the aches and pains were a part of getting older, but no. It was from a running imbalance. And just to add: my weight hasn’t changed from when I was running 80 mile weeks to 50 mile weeks. Our bodies adjust to whatever we ask of them.

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Wow that go-pro takes really amazing pictures huh!? It looks beautiful! And it was a perfectly clear day to see all the views! Last time I went skiing it was insanely foggy and cloudy and we couldn’t see the mountains :( That smores bar looks insane I want it so baddd.

Hmm I don’t know how you eat two bowls of cereal. I either have ONE or I have FOUR. Haha!

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My baby didn’t sleep last night and she is still going strong. So I’m going to take it easy today at the gym. And pray for a solid nap later this morning.

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DID YOU GET A NAP!?!? I sure hope you did!

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Two tibial stress fractures – a really bad one in high school (it looked like a hammer had hit my shin bone on the bone scan) and a milder one in college. I think each one of those was 6 weeks of no running or exercise-walking, just biking and swimming. After the college stress fracture we found out two things: 1) I had to limit how much time I spent running in circles on the track (only interval speed work on the track, everything else on the road/trail no matter how cold/snowy) and 2) although my cycles were completely normal, my body needed LOTS of extra calcium to maintain college-level speed work and mileage. After I changed my training surface and increased my already-high calcium intake…no more stress fractures!

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I’ve never had a stress fracture. I’ve always been pretty careful with injuries and might take more rest than necessary but so far so good. My body prefers only 3 days of running with 2 days of cycling a week. I had a bone density scan when I turned 50 and my bones were solid, I credit genetics, good nutrition and lots of running!

Today’s run was an 8 mile trail run that felt wonderful! 1000+ feet of climbing (and descending) but the views were worth it!

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How do you get a stress fracture and how long does it take to generally heal from one?

Today’s workout was 20 minutes of pilates and then a 75 minute run! I’m so surprised and impressed with myself. I never do that much in a day.

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It does seem surprising that you talk of taking care of the only body you will have in regards to running, but then ski without a helmet. Your beautiful children need you too much to take such a risk.

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Hey Laurie! Thank you for your comment! I wrote this to a few people up above but I will just write it here too: Thank you so much for your comments and concern! I honestly had never really thought about wearing a helmet while skiing… you see them on the guys out there doing the double black diamonds sometimes and I grew up in a family that we never wore them when skiing. BUT now you have brought up some EXCELLENT points. Andrew and I will be really researching this out. Thank you for bringing such an important subject up and I’m thankful for the blog because over the years you have all helped me out in a lot of ways!

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I can’t believe the air quality is keeping you in!? I always think of Utah as having this magical, clean crisp air! Is this something I should worry about? how do you check? I imagine if yours is bad, the Chicago-land area might be also?

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I used to work out 7 days a week for hours and hours. I would make sure I got my run in and then do other forms of exercise like elliptical, yoga, insanity workouts, and much more. I burned way too many calories for what I was eating and ended up realizing how exhausted and unhealthy I was.

Also, your ski day looked so much fun!

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This was timely for me… I’ve never had to deal with a stress fracture, but the past month I had problems with shin pain, and now, just a few days after that finally resolved, I’m having a flare-up of ITBS. I’m so frustrated. I was so patient waiting for the shin splints to heal, but yeah, I think I overdid it once I finally could run again (overeager to get back to 80mpw)… So today was a day off, but I’m desperately hoping this doesn’t mean much more time off for me.

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In 2015-spring 2016 I was running 60-80 mile weeks without taking days off, and I wasn’t listening to my body at all. There was a lot going on with family/love life stuff, and I was afraid to stop running. Cue a downhill skiing accident and a patellar tendon tear that finally forced me to stop. This October I had a PRP injection in my knee, and as soon as I started turning around recovery-wise and starting training for this year’s Boston…bam, found out I was pregnant :) Due to pregnancy related body changes, my hips have already shifted which makes running very hard and painful at times.

My injury workouts include yoga, elliptical/biking, and weights. I’d love to try swimming and pool workouts, but I’m so bad at trying new things!

Still working on “Would You Rather” answers for yesterday, some of them were stumpers :)

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I feel like there are so many people who can relate to you about this. Especially in this health/fitness world and even if you have never had a stress fracture. It is so easy to get caught up in ‘doing more’. Masking disorder for health. I am eating this way to be healthy. I am exercising this much because I am ‘dedicated’. I have never had a stress fracture, but I know the feeling of over training my body and under fueling it at the same time. All the while people would tell me how healthy I was. From the oustide I looked healthy, but on the inside I was not. I didn’t have my period and mentally I was a wreck and I think mental health is such a HUGE component to our overall health. I am glad you were able to have your ah ha moment, reevaluate and make adjustments. That is hard to do. It is easier to just be mad at the situation or blame your body and keep on doing what you are doing.

I love the step mill and weights when I am injured….and when I am not. Ha! Each body is so different to what it can handle before becoming injured and I feel like mine gets worn out so easily. Some people can exercise for 2hrs a day and be just fine. For me an hour a day (or less) is optimal. When I do more, it wears me out instead of energizing me. Today I did a weighted workout dvd (total body chisel) in my workout room before I got the kids up for school.

Your pictures are beautiful , but it sill doesn’t make me want to go outside and/or ski ;) Is Winter over yet? I need a Winter vacation home. After I strike it rich, you can come visit me during Utah’s January.

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I didn’t answer the other day but… I ONLY like soggy cereal. Good taste by you :)

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I love cereal but it has to be crunchy. I was pregnant last winter and we just don’t have time to take a ski trip this year! I hope next year to ski again…It looks so fun!

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please wear a helmet, my friend! a dear friend of mine suffered a traumatic brain injury, and that was just taking an easy run. <3 so happy to see you on the slopes, though!

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Thank you so much Courtney for sharing and we will definitely be researching this out big time and wearing a helmet now!

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Thanks for the info! I used to run 5-6 days and 50 miles per week, for years. Now that I’m older my body can’t handle that kind of mileage and I’ve found that 3 days and no more than 25 miles per week works best for me.

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I’m from Florida so this might be a dumb idea, but couldn’t you use a water gun with warm water to shoot the icicles down? Skiing looks awesome!

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